Medicaid expansion

Budget Games End Tuesday

Tomorrow, lawmakers will be back in Richmond to hold a public hearing on Obamacare expansion. Your presence and voice will make the difference. The Senate Finance Committee — controlled by the same senators who have held the commonwealth's budget hostage to force Obamacare on Virginians, at the expense of funding schools, public safety and everything else — will hear public comments on whether or not to pass a clean budget without expansion. The Family Foundation will join a large coalition of conservative organizations offering testimony tomorrow to oppose the expansion. We need to deliver a clear message to these lawmakers that our emergency service personnel and schools are not pawns for their political games.

While the hearing begins at 2:00, sign-up for those interested in speaking starts at 1:00. Please arrive early enough to help us stop the Obama OFA group and other leftist organizations, such as Moveon.org, from blocking our voice by taking all the speaking slots. It wouldn't surprise us if those groups were given a heads up on this maneuver precisely so it can pack the room with left wing activists.

We cannot stress enough how important it is that conservatives take a public stand in support of a clean budget. Trying to force Obamacare expansion into the budget is wrong for many reasons, not to mention that is highly questionable whether or not it belongs in the budget: It is not an appropriation of state tax dollars, it wasn't passed as stand alone legislation that needs to be funded and it would contravene a law last year that mandated the Medicaid Innovation and Reform Commission do its work and recommend the commonwealth's next move. Furthermore, a program notoriously rife with abuse and never subject to an independent audit should most certainly not be included in the Virginia budget.

There will be free bus rides available for those in Southwest Virginia (as far as Bristol) and Northern Virginia. Sign-up here for a ride from a bus stop near you.

If you cannot make it to the event (and even if you are attending), please take two  convenient actions: Contact members of the Senate Finance Committee by phone or e-mail. Click here for committee members and their contact information. Then, if you haven't done so already, please sign the Pass A Clean Budget Terry Petition to make your voice heard to Governor McAuliffe to pass a clean budget.

McEachin, Senate Dems Conveniently Forget Deadline Extension They Forced In 2012

While the staggering amount of double standards emanating from the Left long since ceased to amaze me, I couldn't help but laugh at loud at Senator Donald McEachin's (D-9, Henrico) floor speech on Obamacare expansion yesterday. He blasted House Republicans for stalling the budget process and potentially sending this year's session into overtime or a special session, the latter of which Democrats vehemently object to. That is, rhetorically. In fact, General Assembly Democrats gladly will go into special session and act as if it's a concession to House Republicans, who oppose the Senate Democrats' proposal to expand Obamacare through the state budget. That's because state law prohibits lawmakers from raising campaign money while in session. Calling quits on the regular 2014 session and reconvening for a special budget session, allows the fundraising appeals to commence. Check your spam filters and bulk mail.

But that's not the biggest McEachin hypocrisy. He sarcastically scolded Republicans, saying that the state budget "isn't a term paper," that "there are snow days and no extensions," and said its due on its deadline of March 8. No questions asked . . . and there were none. But I'll ask them.

For starters, Senator, didn't you and your 19 Democrat colleagues vote en bloc for weeks and weeks well into and beyond the 2012 session's deadline to bottle up the budget process, since the lieutenant governor cannot break ties on the budget? That answer would be yes, and in a way that ended the budget standoff only a Hollywood producer would believe (click here to go down memory lane).

Okay, so I only have that one question. I think that's enough.

But not only does the senator apparently suffer from a memory lapse, he is fundamentally wrong on so many facets of the budget debate. First, Medicaid (Obamacare expansion), is not part of the appropriations process, therefore, should not be part of the budget bill. It is federal dollars and spent separately. It is not money raised from state taxes; it is money from the federal government for a specific program and, therefore, cannot be appropriated as tax money is for education or police, for example. Further, the language inserted in the Senate budget is stand alone language, appropriate only for a separate bill creating a new program.

Secondly, last year, the two chambers agreed that it would not be a part of this year's budget. As part of that deal, the General Assembly created the Medicaid Innovation and Reform Commission to determine which Medicaid reforms to pursue and new ways of securing health care for the poor. Only after its recommendations would Obamacare expansion be considered. Senate Democrats also reject the House Republican proposal for a first-time outside audit of Medicaid, a program with a history of abuse and mismanagement.

It's also funny that the Democrats are concerned with the 400,000 new people Medicaid/Obamacare expansion would cover in Virginia, all well over 100 percent of the poverty line, but not concerned by the five million people nationally who have lost their medical insurance because of Obamacare. How many of those live in Virginia?

Senator McEachin is correct about one thing: It's not a term paper, it's a budget for eight million people, and there is a deadline. But he'd rather blame Republicans for something they haven't done but which his side gladly did in 2012 and are preparing to do again.

Billions and billions. That's what Senate Democrats are trying to force House Republicans into spending on Obamacare expansion in Virginia.

Will Session End On Time?

When the House of Delegates and Senate passed their respective budgets several days ago, the most glaring difference between the two, as anticipated, was the two chambers' approaches to Medicaid expansion. To wit, Obamacare in Virginia. The Senate included expanding Obamacare in its budget despite agreement last year with the House that the issue would be kept separate from the budget so it wouldn't become a stumbling block to passing a future budget. The agreement consisted of the creation of the Medicaid Innovation and Reform Commission, which has the authority to make recommendations to the General Assembly concerning expansion. Its charter is to formulate necessary reforms for the abuse- and fraud-ridden program that state and federal governments must accept before Medicaid expansion gets anywhere near a floor vote for approval.

MIRC has yet, after almost a year's work, to draft its recommendations for reform. Instead, it continued its efforts for another year. Despite last year's agreement and MIRC's continuation, three Senate Republicans — John WatkinsWalter Stosch and Emmett Hanger — joined all 20 Democrats to passing the Senate budget with Medicaid expansion in it. The Senate and Governor Terry McAuliffe want to backtrack on last year's arrangement and want Obamacare expanded immediately.

To emphasize its position, House Republicans offered a budget floor amendment, modeled after the Senate expansion plan. It promptly went down 67-32. House Republicans have maintained that it would be irresponsible to expand Obamacare because future costs would be so great that it could cripple the state budget.

They also argue that the program is wrought with inefficiency and fraud and have proposed a first-ever outside audit before any expansion can take place. By example, former Governor Tim Kaine refused a VDOT audit for his four years and closed rest stops and other unnecessary cuts. After he left office, the audit House Republicans sought finally took place and revealed more than $1 billion in waste. There's no telling how much waste an audit of Medicaid would uncover since it is much larger than VDOT — about 21 percent of Virginia's budget and growing fast.

Most insiders in Richmond believe that the battle over Obamacare expansion will leave the state without a budget well into spring, if not longer. A new budget must be adopted by June 30 or state government could theoretically "shut down" July 1. Governor McAuliffe has stated that he intends to veto any budget sent to him that does not include Obamcare expansion and willingly shut down state government in order to get his way — not this session's much referenced, bipartisan-and-honor-your-agreements buzz phrase, "Virginia Way." That means police and fire departments without funding, teachers without pay and roads unpaved, among other disruptions.

A few days after the House passed its budget, reports surfaced that that Governor McAuliffe threatened vetoes of legislators' unrelated bills if they didn't go along with expansion,  something his office quickly denied. But delegates took to the floor later to recount the governor's bullying tactics and threats.

The House and Senate remain in conference in an attempt to settle their budget differences. But if conferees cannot come up with a solution before March 8, the General Assembly will have to adjourn without a budget — an unprecedented scenario that is growing more likely by the hour during this last week of session. Also, should a budget not pass, or a budget pass without the continuation of the MIRC, some believe that the governor will unilaterally expand Obamacare. That action could result in litigation, leaving it up to Attorney General Mark Herring to choose sides on the issue.

If it all sounds like Washington style politics and not "The Virginia Way," you're right. It's what many predicted during the campaign if Governor McAuliffe was elected. Be prepared to watch this battle go on well into the spring, and beyond.

Virginia, and "The Virginia Way," isn't for shutdowns. But it may come to that. 

Governor McAuliffe Has Kept One Promise: He's NOT Reading The Bills!

As we've previously noted, and other media as well, Governor Terry McAuliffe hasn't rushed out to stake a claim on too many issues — unless it's to support the abortion industry or promote Medicaid expansion. Today, though, out of the blue (or, gray, as dark tornado-warning clouds enveloped Richmond), he spoke — kinda. His spokesman did. Of all things and of all bills, the spokesman said that the governor will veto SB 236 — a "prayer bill" — which passed the Senate early in session and now is in the House of Delegates, if it  reaches his desk. The bill's patron is Senator Charles Carrico (R-40, Galax).

There's a problem. The man who infamously said during the campaign that he wouldn't read bills because he would hire people to do it for him (see Washington Post), apparently hasn't read this bill or doesn't want to — because it's not a prayer bill! It's a freedom of speech bill. But according to the Post today, the governor has his sights set on the "Prayer Bill."

We don't know why. We hope he takes a break long enough from his 60 parties in 60 days to actually read the bill. Then he might find it's not offensive at all — as if prayer is offensive — and that he would be doing a good thing by strengthening students' rights of freedom of speech, expression and association on campus.

T-Mac drinking

Read more, party less. Sign the students' rights bill.

Oppose Obamacare Expansion In Virginia!

On Sunday, the Senate Finance Committee and House Appropriations Committee released their respective budgets (see them here). Each chamber will debate the details of those budgets this week, with votes coming on Thursday. Perhaps the most glaring difference between the two budgets is just what was expected — the Senate budget includes an expansion of Obamacare — Medicaid expansion — and the House budget does not.

Please click here to contact your senator and delegate and urge them to reject any budget that includes expanding Obamacare in any way!

While supporters of expansion in the Senate claim their program isn't really expansion, the consequences of its proposal are the same. Couching it as a "private market" plan, advocates of the Senate budget hope to gain support. But regardless of the rhetoric, the plan expands Obamacare.

The glaring failures of Obamacare, including the millions who have lost health care coverage or are having to pay substantially higher premiums, the loss of work hours, the loss of jobs, the constant implementation delays because the law is unworkable, and the growing fears the federal government will not be able to hold up its financial commitment in future years, are just some of the reasons Virginia should avoid expanding the program.

Obama changes Obamacare

Beyond that, the arguments for expansion of Medicaid are disingenuous at best and dangerous at worst. For example, some argue that Virginia will "lose money to other states" if we don't expand. That is fundamentally false. Medicaid money is based on a federal formula. If we don't receive the money, it doesn't go to other states because other states just get what the formula prescribes for those states and no more.

Proponents also argue that hospitals will lose millions of dollars in funding for indigent care without expansion because the money the federal government has been sending to hospitals was to be cut off in exchange for Medicaid dollars. But that cut in funding has been delayed a year (big surprise), and most hospitals are running well in the black. It is up to the federal government, which botched this entire program, to fix the problem and not simply dump it on the states to figure out.

Even worse, perhaps, than the failures of the Obamacare rollout are the failures of Medicaid itself. Studies have shown that care within Medicaid sometimes leaves a lot to be desired (see Avik Roy at Forbes). It is a fundamentally flawed program that bleeds fraud and provides inadequate care for those who desperately need it. Nearly doubling the program's size in Virginia without massive changes is foolish.

Frankly, one of the main problems with the battle over Obamacare is that we no longer are having a serious conversation about how to fix our health care system, deliver high quality care to all Americans (especially those who are in need of assistance) and do so in a financially responsible way. We are fighting over failed programs and a failed law, instead of figuring out real, 21st century solutions to our health care needs.

For all of these reasons, we strongly oppose expanding Obamacare in Virginia, and urge you to contact your legislators to urge them to oppose a budget that includes Medicaid/Obamacare expansion. This battle likely will force the General Assembly into overtime, but for what's at stake, the battle is worth the time.

ACTION: Please click here to contact your Senator and Delegate and urge them to reject any budget that includes expanding Obamacare in any way!

Video: Conservative Caucus News Conference

The Virginia General Assembly Conservative Caucus held a news conference yesterday to highlight its 2014 agenda. Its House chairman, Delegate Ben Cline (R-24, Amherst), led the event and was joined by two freshman colleagues: Delegates Mark Berg (R-29, Winchester) and Dave LaRock (R-33, Hamilton), each of whom have hit the ground running with bold legislation. Delegate Cline said:

The Virginia Conservative Caucus is putting forward a positive agenda that addresses the challenges facing working individuals and families across the commonwealth. Virginians have stated that they want to see more jobs created by businesses, lower taxes and commonsense, efficient government. We know real solutions are what Virginia families are demanding from their government, and we are reflecting that demand in our agenda.

The Conservative Caucus is comprised of approximately 70 members in both the House of Delegates and Virginia Senate. Its Senate chairman is Mark Obenshain (R-26, Harrisonburg). It focuses on three areas of public policy: job creation and opportunity; strengthening and protecting families; and limiting government and defending freedom; and annually releases a legislative agenda featuring dozens of bills across all three areas.

Delegate Cline highlighted his HB 1243, a bill to reduce the state corporate income tax rate from six to five percent to generate job creation. Delegate LaRock featured his HB 950, a bill to provide a homeschool and private school income tax credit to foster education choice and competition; and Delegate Berg, a doctor, unveiled his HB 338, a bill to restrict the State Corporation Commission's functions with the federal Obamacare health care exchanges.

In addition to its agenda of positive bills, and his promise to work with Governor Terry McAuliffe on areas of mutual agreement, Delegate Cline also emphasized promised to "resist Medicaid expansion strongly." He said, "It makes no sense to expand a program to cover an additional 400,000 Virginians that currently serves 800,000" by inceasing by 139 percent the definition of poverty. Here is the video of the entire news conference:

The Virginia Conservative Caucus announces its 2014 General Assembly legislative agenda. 

The Scorpion Tongue Guv And Another QOD

As I wrote earlier, Governor Terry McAuliffe made an engaging appearance last night at former Senator and current Virginia Beach Sheriff Ken Stolle's annual chili cook-off. He greeted and spoke with all who approached him, sampled the chili and awarded the judges' winners their awards. One of the awards was to Republican activist Wayne Ozmore, whose "Scorpion and Ghost Pepper Chili" easily won the award for the hottest chili. I have braved Wayne's chili in the past and bravely finished the cup-size serving. This year, he outdid himself. One spoon and it was no mas for me and most others. He detailed his recipe to me. All I can remember is that it was loaded with every type of blistering spice known to man and topped with brown sugar to effect a delayed heat explosion, obliterating your taste buds well past any point of recall. It took a hamburger size roll, two bottles of water and about 15 minutes to recondition my tongue and try another contestant's chili.

But the governor must have iron taste buds. When Wayne approached to accept his award, T-Mac boasted that he ate his entire cup of "Scorpion and Ghost Pepper Chili," and asked if any other governor had ever done so. (I don't recall too many governors attending the event.) Wayne responded with a Quote of the Day to a room full of laughs:

We've never had a governor who could take the heat!

The governor ate it up quicker than Ozmore's chili went down. Whether that turns out to be true in a political sense remains to be seen — or, conversely, how much heat he'll be able to exert on resistant Republican lawmakers, especially on Medicaid expansion. After all, it's pretty apparent that Governor McAuliffe, in his previous life as a highly partisan mega fundraiser, has probably sampled some pretty exotic foods. But it may require more sweetness on his part, especially after his slash and burn campaign. Delicious desserts were on offer last night, too, and he probably had his share of them as well as chili. They're certainly part of the fare at the big money bashes to which he is accustomed while campaigning for the Clintons and Obamas.

My friend Wayne's remark was a very humorous, spontaneous line. I complimented him on it and he told me he didn't mean it, that it just came barreling out of his mouth. No problem. We'll get used to that over the next four years.

T-Mac and Ozmore

From left, Virginia Beach Sheriff and former Senator Ken Stolle, award-winning chili cook Wayne Ozmore and Governor Terry McAuliffe. Ozmore's line gives us rare multiple Quotes of the Day.

Special Message From Mike Huckabee

Former Arkansas Governor and Fox News Channel's Mike Huckabee has a special message that he recorded for Virginia's values voters concerning the importance of voting in this year's gubernatorial election this coming Tuesday, November 5. Virginians will elect a new governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and the entire House of Delegates. There is much at stake (see this short video), including maintaining Virginia's new abortion center safety standards, religious freedom to allow church affiliated adoption agencies to place babies with married couples who adhere to their religious beliefs, the hard won school choice law, the defense of Virginia's Marriage Amendment, defunding Planned Parenthood and taxpayer funding of abortion, the expansion of Medicaid and Obamacare in the Commonwealth — not to mention job creation, responsible tax and budget policies — and so much more. Please take one minute to hear Governor Huckabee and make plans to vote on November 5, or by absentee before then if necessary, and be sure to share this and encourage others to vote, too.

[audio mp3="http://familyfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Family-Foundation-of-VA-.mp3"][/audio]

The Family Foundation Action is a non-partisan, non-profit 501(c)(4) organization and paid for this informational communication. Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.

Big Labor, Big Corporations, CONGRESS: Obamacare Exemptions For Everyone But US! Five Ways Obamacare Could Impact You Immediately

The ticking time bomb known as Obamacare — complete with exploding federal deficits, obliterated state budgets and collateral damage to jobs, businesses, the economy in general and, oh yeah, the thing it was supposed to fix, your health coverage — is nigh. Perhaps no one has brought more attention to the peril than U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, our 2013 Gala Speaker on October 5 (see information about for tickets). As the clock counts down to its October implementation, and Congressional conservatives such as Senator Cruz and several stalwarts in the House of Representatives press on now that the Senate returned the government funding bill back to the House without the Obamacare defunding language — not to mention the impending decision Virginia must make as to whether to expand Medicaid under Obamacare — its impact will create some very real negative changes. Kelsey Harris at The Heritage Foundation's The Foundry Blog lists five:

1. Will young adults, whose premiums will skyrocket, ever go to a doctor if it's cheaper to pay the tax than to buy insurance?

The absolute insanity of this never ceases to amaze me: Make it so expensive for young people to buy insurance, but then offer them a taxpayer subsidy to enter the Obamacare exchange. This saves money how? It gets even more expensive if a person who is driven out of his or her insurance seeks medical attention at an emergency room, the exact scenario the leftist authors of the law say they're trying to prevent.

2. When will people have time to find a new doctor?

Despite promises by the president, people will not be able to keep their doctors.

3. Premiums for young families will rise dramatically.

Rising costs will make it more difficult to buy necessary supplies for children.

4. Lost jobs or reduced hours and revoked coverage.

Because of the costs to employers, many companies are reducing full-time jobs to part-time jobs or laying off people because enormous and burdensome regulations on businesses that employ a certain threshold of full-time workers. Additionally, it has forced many to cease offering insurance plans that cover spouses. Since, even today, that means cutting off the wife form the insurance plan, one might conclude that this is a real War on Women.

5.  Another striker against women, especially single moms.

Since moms typically have custody of children in broken marriages, who will provide health insurance for the children when and if the mom is laid off?

Don't believe the lost jobs argument? Think it's hyperbole and a scare tactic? You don't have to wait until Obamacare is in full force. It's been happening for sometime now, as Rusty Weiss documents here at the FreedomWorks Blog. Here's a list of only some companies that have, or will lay off employees or eliminate jobs:

1. Welch Allyn: 275 employees this year and planned on dropping roughly 10 percent of its workforce over the next three years.

2. Orlando Health: 400 jobs.

3. Stryker: 1,000 jobs.

4. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center: 950 jobs.

5. Boston Scientific: Between 1,200 and 1,400 jobs in 2011; up to 1,000 employees this year.

6. Smith & Nephew: 100 employees.

7. A Blue Cross/Blue Shield: 100 employees.

8. Medtronic: 1,000 jobs by the end of the fourth quarter.

9. Reading Hospital: 391 jobs.

10. Abbott Laboratories: 1,900 jobs.

All cited specific new regulations and/or new taxes in Obamacare that have made it untenable for them to maintain their present staffing levels. In the meantime, big corporations, big labor and  Congress all have received Obamacare exemptions granted by . . . Congress itself and President Obama! Everyone but the average American citizen. In a few short days we'll know it and feel it for sure.

Photo

Everyone but us! (H/T FreedomWorks via Doc Thompson)

Medicaid Expansion In Virginia: Impact And Cost To Taxpayers

Why do we, as conservatives, oppose Medicaid expansion in Virginia (speaking generally, not for any TFF position)? This chart from Drew Gonshorowski at the Heritage Foundation's Foundry Blog (via John Taylor of the Virginia Institute for Public Policy) demonstrates why, in very stark terms. U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, in a desperate attempt to get governors to adopt the Obamacare state health insurance exchanges, has peddled the fallacy of "free money" (direct funding from the federal government) for Medicaid in the short term (thus the net savings through 2016). In essence, it's a bribe with taxpayer money at the cost of massive debt her administration won't have to pay back. After that, though, the states face the obligations of the expanded government-run health program on their own, which sticks them with unconscionable costs and burdens for years to come — not to mention the crowding out of traditional services state and local governments provide, such as police, fire, rescue, transportation and education. get-attachment-4

 

There's no such thing as free money. There is something called unsustainable debt. But try telling that to proponents of Obamacare and Medicaid expansion.

The Pols Are Out And So Are Their Grades: American Conservative Union Releases Virginia General Assembly Scorecard

The General Assembly wrapped up its 2013 business, officially, April 3, at the conclusion of the "Veto" session. Since then, a flurry of scorecards have been released by several organizations, including the Family Foundation's late last week. Usually released throughout the year to coincide with fundraising galas, elections or other events, many organizations this year dropped their ratings in advance of the Republican Convention this weekend and the June Democrat primary. Today, the American Conservative Union released its third annual Virginia General Assembly Scorecard (click here for complete results). The ACU, founded in 1964 by a coalition of prominent national conservative organizations, is known for its annual Congressional Scorecard, considered the "gold standard" of Congressional ratings. In 2011, it decided to take that success to the state level, with a goal of annual rating all members in each of the 50 state legislatures. That year, it graded five, Virginia being the first of those (this  year it will score 20). Consequently, the General Assembly is the first to be scored three times — more firsts for the Old Dominion.

The ACU Scorecard offers three awards: Defender of Liberty Award, for those who score 100 percent; the ACU Conservative Award for those who score above 80 percent, and the not-so-coveted True Liberal of the Commonwealth Award for those who get a zero — and there are a few of those. However, the number of members in both chambers who scored 80 or higher dropped precipitously, with some who have reputations as conservative stalwarts not even even getting to 80 percent.

The reason? Not only were there several immensely important and substantive votes this year on significant policies with massive ramifications, they were voted on multiple times. For instance, the tax increase bill (HB 2313) was voted on three times (scored twice). An ironic twist is that the House budget, which normally rates as a support because of its pretty tight spending parameters and policy language, was opposed by the ACU when it came out of conference committee with the Senate, specifically because the rejection of the Medicaid expansion was stripped out. That also got a second vote because of a gubernatorial amendment. The Obamacare health insurance exchange also made the list and several conservatives got nicked on that, as well.

The ACU Virginia Scorecard is not only the most comprehensive one of its nature in Virginia — complied annually, with more than 20 floor votes on everything from spending, taxes, education reform, securing voting rights, second amendment rights, religious liberty, right to work, life and marriage, and all else that make up the conservative agenda, it's one the most comprehensive state scorecard in the country, as many legislatures, especially part-time ones, rarely let so many significant votes get to the floor. The ACU only scores floor votes and does not score unanimous or immensely lopsided votes, nor partisan votes, with the exception of significant policy shifting bills.

In a statement released today by the ACU, its Chairman Al Cardenas, said:

On behalf of the American Conservative Union, I am pleased to announce the winners of our 2013 State Legislative Ratings for members of the Virginia General Assembly. For 40 years ACU has set the gold standard for Congressional ratings, and we are now able to offer that same level of transparent information to the voters of Old Dominion so they can hold their elected officials accountable at the state level as well. In our third year rating the Commonwealth, we applaud conservatives in the Virginia General Assembly who continue to fight against higher taxes, against Obamacare and for the rights of the unborn.

The ACU's philosophy in its scorecard system is to track . . .

a wide range of issues before state legislatures to determine which issues and votes serve as a clear litmus test separating those representatives who defend liberty and liberal members who have turned their backs on our founding principles — constitutionally limited government, individual liberty, free markets, a strong national defense and traditional values. The votes selected for our Virginia Legislative Ratings were chosen to create a clear ideological distinction among those casting them.

The Defenders of Liberty Award winners are:

Delegates Rob Bell, Ben Cline, Scott Garrett, Todd Gilbert (TFF Legislator of the Year Award winner), and Margaret Ransone; and Senators Tom Garrett, Jr., Mark Obenshain and Ralph Smith.

ACU Conservative Award winners are Delegates Richard Anderson, Richard Bell, Kathy Byron, Mark Cole, Barbara Comstock, John Cox, Mark Dudenhefer, Matt Fariss, Peter Farrell, Greg Habeeb, Chris Head, Tim Hugo, Sal Iaquinto, Steve Landes, Jim LeMunyon, Scott Lingamfelter, Bob Marshall, Jimmie Massie, Jackson Miller, Randy Minchew, Israel O’Quinn, Brenda Pogge, David Ramadan, Roxann Robinson, Nick Rush, Beverly Sherwood, Lee Ware, Jr., Michael Webert, Tony Wilt, and Tommy Wright, Jr.; and Senators Richard Black, Steve Newman, Richard Stuart, Bryce Reeves, Steve Martin, Bill Stanley, Jr., and Ryan McDougle.

The highest scoring Democrats were Delegates Johnny Joannou and Joe Joe Johnson at 73 and 64 percent, respectively. The both  topped some Republicans, such as Delegate Chris Jones, who scored only 60 percent. Delegate Jones wasn't alone. Speaker Bill Howell only managed to match Delegate Joannou. Senate Republicans saw similar slippages. For example, Senators Jeff McWaters and Frank Ruff, who had scored at least 80 in the first two scorecards, dropped to the low 60s. Majority Leader Tommy Norment and Senator Harry Blevins, who retired recently in mid-term, scored 60 and 57 percent, respectively. Senator John Watkins rated a dismal 48 percent.

Last year, more than 70 Republicans from both chambers scored 80 percent or higher. This year, only 45 did.

The members who earned the True Liberal of Old Dominion Awards are Delegates Delores McQuinn and Roslyn Tyler; and Senators Kenneth Alexander, Janet Howell and Linda Puller.