Paul

Virginia News Stand: May 4, 2010

Annotations & Elucidations Ashcroft Envy?

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has reminded us of a move by then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft in 2002, who had the topless female Spirit of Justice statue covered in the Great Hall of the Department of Justice. In Mr. Cuccinelli's case, he wanted to issue a new lapel pin with a modified Seal of the Commonwealth, which features an exposed breast of the Roman goddess Virtus, that would be fully clothed. He said it is a replica of an old version of the seal. Knowing the AG's love of history, that must be true. Yet, the ensuing media racket persuaded him to revert to the standard issue. Unsurprisingly, the same people who have created this disproportionate distraction over this incredibly minor deal are the same ones hammering him for "distracting and frivolous" actions fighting the EPA and ObamaCare, though that is what he is sworn to do — uphold Virginia law. But blowing up minutia to cover for a lack of substance is never a consideration for the left.

In the News: The prayer State Police Chaplain prayer policy continues to make news, even nationally, and we're along for the ride in the three of the first four links below. The AG makes headlines for other reasons, as well. He has a 100-day review in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (where you'll find more Family Foundation quotes) and he's made more national headlines requesting — under Virginia law — documents from a former U.Va. professor who may have been involved in deceptive "science" and defrauded the commonwealth out of hundreds of thousands of dollars in grant money.

In Analysis, Erica Werner of the AP may not have a job tomorrow after the White House reads her piece documenting what it says about its actions on the Gulf oil spill aren't exactly the truth. Also, according to the AP, as many as 80 Dem Congressional seats now are in play; and Marc Thiessen reports that Senator Jim Demint (R-S.C.) is leading a conservative revolution in GOP Senate primaries. In Commentary, it's Larry Kudlow on money and Star Parker on Life. If that doesn't sum it up, nothing does.

News

*McDonnell strikes a balance, conservatives rethink support (Washington Post)

*Virginia's new policy on prayer policy (Newsweek/Washington Post)

*Va. governor lifts ban on police chaplains’ sectarian prayers (Associated Baptist Press)

*Cuccinelli draws praise, derision (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

State attorney general demands ex-professor's files from University of Virginia (Washington Post)

Cuccinelli goes for a more modest version of the state seal (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

AG Cuccinelli drops new lapel pin to get away from distractions . . . (The Shad Plank Blog)

Cuccinelli ditches lapel pin with altered Virginia seal (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Cuccinelli yanks lapel pin with breast-plate-covered goddess (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot)

Franklin County activist to head 5th District GOP (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Independent says he would run if Hurt on ballot in 5th District (Lynchburg News & Advance)

National News

Attorneys agree to block on Oklahoma abortion law (Washington Post)

Union: Va. Firm's Ads chiding Ark. Senate candidate 'racist' (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Report: Congress makes too many vague laws (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Dobson changes mind, endorses Paul for Ky. Senate (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Analysis

Virginia Attorney General goes after Mann and UVA (Anthony Watts/Watts Up With That? Blog)

Leading the charge for GOP insurgents (Marc A. Thiessen/Washington Post)

SPIN METER: There since Day One? Maybe not (Erica Werner/AP/GOPUSA.com)

GOP expands political playing field; Dems slipping (Liz Sidoti/AP/GOPUSA.com)

Commentary

The Left Loses Its Way by Abandoning 'Third Way' (Michael Barone/GOPUSA.com)

The NAACP and Abortion Politics (Star Parker/TownHall.com)

Race and Resentment (Thomas Sowell/GOPUSA.com)

Obamacon Doves vs. Hard-Money Heartland Hawks (Larry Kudlow/GOPUSA.com)

'Government is Us' (Richard Olivastro/GOPUSA.com)

Virginia News Stand: April 15, 2010

Annotations & Elucidations The Nuts And Bolts, Tax Day, TEA Party Version

After yesterday's very meaty edition of the News Stand, we've compiled a very basic version today — can't always keep that pace up, you know. Plus, there's other stuff to do. (What good conservative blogger wouldn't be getting ready for the TEA Party tonight?) Still, we have a good variety of reading for you today, especially of state news, of which we play a big part (the first three links).

Something else of interest: The Virginia Supreme Court heard arguments earlier this week on a property dispute between the (liberal) Episcopal Diocese of Virginia and nine more traditional (or orthodox) parishes that broke away and kept their property when the Episcopals appointed an openly homosexual bishop in New Hampshire a few years ago. The diocese wants the land back. At contention is an 1867 Virginia law meant to referee such disputes. 

Nationally, the polls show liberal leaders falling faster than American prestige around the world, and — lo and behold! — TEA Party members are wealthier and better educated than most and not racist! Golly Gee! (This is only news to mainstream media types, but fun to cite.)

Have fun paying your taxes (those who do) and attend a TEA Party!

News

*McDonnell proposes adding to Va. budget to attract commerce (Washington Post)

*Pro-choice plate avoids McDonnell veto pen (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot)

*Governor McDonnell Targets Abortion Funding (Video 2:16) (CBS6/WTVR.com)

McDonnell makes no vetoes to legislation (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Going fast more costly (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)

McDonnell amends 122 bills (Roanoke Times)

19 Baptist pastors criticize McDonnell (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Va. Episcopal hierarchy fights to keep church property (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Analysis

Tea Party Supporters Richer, More Educated Than Most, Poll Finds (FOXNews.com)

AP-GfK Poll: Obama slips, other Dems slide, too (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Poll shows resistance to health care bill rising (AP/GOPUSA.com)

National News

Tea Party leaders on alert for infiltrators (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Bunning endorses outsider Paul in Kentucky US Senate race (AP/GOPUSA.com)

RNC chairman: GOP wants to help black community (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Fla. governor Crist might run for Senate as independent (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Commentary

Establishment Terrified by Tea Party Movement (Matt Towery/GOPUSA.com)

GOP Should Push Tough Regulation of Wall Street (Michael Barone/GOPUSA.com)

William Ayers' Wyoming Debacle Highlights Leftist Weaknesses (Christopher G. Adamo/GOPUSA.com)

The Individual Mandate: We're All Amish Now (Jon N. Hall/GOPUSA.com)

Will Government Replace God?

Friday's Wall Street Journal contained an excellent article written by none other than Dr. Brad Wilcox, The Family Foundation's very own Marriage Commission member. OK, he's more than a Marriage Commission member.  When we are not utilizing his expertise, he also serves as a sociology professor at the University of Virginia. Seriously, we've been so honored to have Brad be apart of our organization that we have soaked him for all the time we can get. We had him speak at our 2007 Lobby Day, our 2008 Board of Directors Retreat and to the General Assembly House Education Committee in 2009. Imagine what 2010 holds for you Brad! Dr. Wilcox' WSJ article outlines the inverse relationship between size and scope of government and the religious observation. Basically, the more folks turn to the government to provide all of their needs (Scandanavia, etc.), the less they need to turn to the church. Anyone who has fallen on hard times knows that the blow is softer when cushioned by a loving and supportive church community. While it might have been good enough for Paul and his cohorts to "sell their possessions and goods and give to anyone as he had need," today this wonderful human experience requiring self-sacrifice and a sense of community is less desirable if the government can provide "cradle to the grave" health care, education and housing. 

Combine these findings with a study we co-released with the Family Research Council in December 2008 that showed children have fewer problems at school and home when they frequently attend religious services. Coauthored by Drs. Nicholas Zill[1] and Philip Fletcher [2], this research found that religious attendance had an effect on the likelihood of repeating a grade level, having their parents contacted by school for behavioral issues, diminished social development and much more. These differences held up even after controlling for family income and poverty, low parent education levels, and race and ethnicity.

So, bigger government means less religious participation and less religious attendance means behavioral and educational challenges for children. As we continue on the road to the great welfare state, let's be sure we know the end game.

[1] Dr. Nicholas Zill is the founding president of Child Trends and the former vice president of Westat, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

[2] Dr. Philip Fletcher is a research psychologist at Westat.