Senator Creigh Deeds

Breaking News: Senate Sub-Committee Sends Property Rights Amendment To Full P&E! Committee Votes This Afternoon; Contact Committee Members!

In a shockingly good news event earlier today, a Virginia Senate sub-committee finally did the will of the people and voted to report HJ 693, a constitutional amendment to protect your property rights! It passed 4-3, with Democrat Senator Creigh Deeds joining Republicans Steve Martin, Jeff McWaters and Ralph Smith. Now, after six years of thwarting this popular issue and fundamental right, there is a real chance to see this resolution passed by the General Assembly and on the ballot for Virginians to vote on.

But we need you to act NOW!

The full Senate Privileges and Elections Committee meets at 4:00 p.m. TODAY! That committee will decide whether the resolution goes to the Senate floor, where it will have an excellent chance to pass.

Please take a very short moment to contact senators on the committee and urge them to vote for HJ 693, to ensure your property rights and just compensation when your property is taken for a legitimate public use.

Click here to see committee members and access their contact information.

Today, in sub-committee, we beat back the special interests, the big corporations and utilities, and local governments and housing authorities (who use your tax dollars to lobby against your rights). As of right now, they are plotting to kill this fundamental right this afternoon in the full committee.

But your voice matters! Please act now on this Family Foundation priority legislation!

Six years is long enough! Urge these senators to vote for HJ 693 this afternoon in the Privileges and Elections Committee so that we can finally have the constitutional protections for our private property rights that other states have!

Pro-Life Bills Up Thursday In Senate Ed And Health

This Thursday the Senate Education and Health Committee will vote on several pro-life bills that are priorities of The Family Foundation. Please contact the members of the Ed and Health committee (see here) and urge them to pass the following bills:

HB 334 (Delegate Bob Marshall, R-13, Manassas): This bill would require that our Informed Consent law be updated to include information that has been published in a peer reviewed medical journal about the consequences of abortion on future pregnancies. Ironically, Planned Parenthood, which has accused pregnancy resource centers of disseminating information that is not "medically accurate," is opposed to this bill that requires the information given to women at Virginia's unregulated abortion centers to be exactly that —  medically accurate.

HB 393 (Delegate Matt Lohr, R-26, Harrisonburg): This legislation would require Virginia’s unregulated abortion centers to have on site life saving equipment, as well as require licensing and regular inspection. Currently, Virginia’s abortion centers are unregulated and uninspected.

HB 1042 (Delegate Kathy Byron, R-22, Lynchburg): This bill would require that unregulated abortion centers perform an ultrasound to better determine the gestational age of the unborn child prior to an abortion, and offer the woman seeking the abortion the opportunity to view the ultrasound. It would bring Virginia's Informed Consent law in line with modern medical technology.

If you are familiar at all with the Virginia General Assembly then you are aware just how antagonistic the majority of the Ed and Health committee usually is toward even the most reasonable pro-life legislation. On an annual basis, we see pro-life bills die on what we have begun to call "Black Thursday" — the last Thursday of committee hearings each session.

Why, bother contacting these legislators who seem so clearly opposed to protecting the unborn? There are several reasons:

First, past votes are not always indications of future action. Legislators change their minds. You may recall Senator Creigh Deeds (D-25, Bath), while running for governor, talking about "growing" as a legislator (he was referring to his flip-flop on the Marriage Amendment). We have worked with legislators who have become more and more pro-life over their time in the legislature, often through the education process associated with debate over these bills.

Which leads to a second reason, education. These bills offer us the opportunity to educate both legislators and the public on these important issues. They give you the opportunity to discuss controversial issues with friends and neighbors by talking about reasonable measures often supported by large majorities. Each time we present these bills to a committee we are able to reach more people with the message of the importance of protecting both the unborn and women who face a crisis pregnancy. You never know when a legislator is going to hear an argument that is going to change their opinion of a certain piece of legislation.

Finally, these votes expose where legislators currently are on reasonable abortion measures. Several members of the Ed and Health committee are in districts that have a pro-life  constituency. These senators mask as "moderate," but their voting records on these bills have exposed their real positions. Next year, when these senators are up for re-election, the voters in their districts will know exactly where they stand on these issues because they will have a four-year voting record to look at. Voters will then be able to hold them accountable for their votes.

So, please do your part. Contact the members of the Ed and Health committee and urge them to support HB 334, HB 393 and HB 1042.

How The Historic Senate Vote On Health Care Freedom Happened

It's not hyberbole to say this afternoon's Senate vote was historic. The legislation it passed in three identically worded bills – SB 283, SB 311 and SB 417 – guarantees Virginians the right to freely choose their health care options irregardless of federal government mandates. It also asserts a notion long ignored but firmly ingrained in the U.S. Constitution. It also shows, from a political perspective, that there are Democrats who understand the small government movement isn't limited to "swastika-wearing" thugs as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi would have us believe. The floor debate wasn't as dramatic as I — and those of us who relish political theater — had hoped. Sure, there were some pointed questions, but judging by the temperment of the questions and their lack of heft, it could have been mistaken for a transportation funding bill. That was an immediate clue the Senate majority knew it had lost more than two defectors from its caucus. If it was only two, there would have been deal making, recesses to sweat them out, arm twisting, all of the above or more.

If there was a surprise, it was in how many Dems defected and who two of them were: Senators Ed Houck (D-17, Spotsylvania) and John Miller (D-1, Newport News). There were rumors about the former last week (acceptable, but believe-it-when-you-see-it) and hope about the latter (no way that's gonna happen). The third new vote, also rumored late last week, Senator Roscoe Reynolds (D-20, Martinsville), was a more likely possibility. Although the 23-17 margin was a pleasant shock, I rooted for a showdown 20-20 tie that Lt. Governor Bill Bolling would have broken in the affirmative. That would have been more headline grabbing.

Not that the debate wasn't sharp. The questions from Senate liberals to the bills’ patrons — Senators Fred Quayle (R-13, Suffolk), SB 283; Steve Martin (R-11, Chesterfield) SB 311; and Jill Vogel (R-27, Winchester), SB 417 — came from Senators Donald McEachin (D-9, Henrico), John Edwards (D-21, Roanoke), and Majority Leader Richard Saslaw (D-37, Springfield), as well as the more moderate Senator Chap Peterson (D-34, Fairfax). But their questions repeatedly missed the point, including questions about contracts, insurance requirements to join athletic clubs, and ex-spouses providing insurance in divorce settlements. Senator Quayle nailed it in his opening remarks when he said, "This bill attempts to reinforce the Constitution of the United States. … The Constitution doesn’t grant rights to anyone. It puts limits on what government can do to us."

Nothing more needed to be said. This being the Senate, of course, more was. Including this gem from the not-smarting-enough-from-his-November-trip-to-the-shed Senator Creigh Deeds (D-25, Bath), who complained that with the economy and employment in bad shape, the General Assembly should not be "legislating in theory." A LOL coming from a guy who was shredded primarily because of national issues involving government intervention. Besides, he should know that it's Washington liberals who have ignored the economy and jobs for an entire year in lieu of health care "reform." But it's not theory. The Constitution is the law of the land. Amazing he doesn't understand that, but his comments today make it clear why his campign was a case study in political disasters, prompting comparisons to other campaigns ("Deeds-like").

At the beginning of session, not many people gave this legislation a chance of getting out of a Senate committee, much less passing the Senate floor by a wide margin. But it happened thanks to a large coalition comprised of thousands of activists from across Virginia, many of whom have been here several times to lobby their representatives and attend committee hearings.

But this is the General Assembly, after all, and nothing becomes law until it is signed. So vigilence is needed. We will stay on top of this legislation — and encourage all supporters to do the same — until it passes both chambers and is signed into law.

DNC To Pull Plug (And $5 Million) From Deeds?

RedState.com's Moe Lane blogged early this morning that the Democrat National Committee — the organization headed by Virginia Governor Tim Kaine — is going to hold back $5 million from its gubernatorial candidate, Senator Creigh Deeds (see here). Lane based his post on reporting from Jim Geraghty at the campaign spot blog at National Review Online (see here). Geraghty, in turn, took his info from a report in The Augusta Free Press ("The Valley's Progressive News Source") where Chris Graham writes:

The bad poll news comes on the heels of a story circulating in Democratic circles today that the Democratic National Committee is reportedly holding on to its $5 million financial commitment to the Deeds campaign out of concern that the Deeds campaign has focused too much of its attention on the controversial Bob McDonnell 1989 grad-school thesis setting out a hardline social-conservative political agenda for his budding political career and not enough on putting down a framework for what a Deeds administration would do for Virginia.

If true, the irony rivals fantasy — pulling the plug for his obsessive negative ads and hammering Republican Bob McDonnell on "divisive social issues." Looks like it's only dividing the senator from his campaign lifeline. But then again, maybe it's because the DNC saw this and this.

New Rasmussen Poll This Afternoon: McDonnell Up 51-42

We're awash in polls right now and the attending controversy they inevitably entail. But a new poll released a few hours ago may shed light on which polls are more accurate — or not (see Politico.com). Rasmussen Reports today released a poll that shows Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob McDonnell leading his Democrat opponent, Senator Creigh Deeds, 51-42 (see RasmussenReports.com). Rasmussen's previous poll had the difference at only two percentage points, contributing to the perception of a tightening race. Subsequent polls from the liberal Washington Post (a four-point difference), which has endorsed Deeds, and Public Policy Polling, a Democrat leaning firm, (a five-point difference) confirmed that perception.

Yesterday, however, a SurveyUSA/WDBJ poll had the GOP ticket up by double digits. But it was largely ignored by the Mainstream Media because its results are out of line with the others. Now, the very reputable Rasmussen poll seems as close to the SurveyUSA/WDBJ poll as it does the PPP poll (which one Richmond radio station reported on for a full 24 hours). Furthermore, even the PPP poll has Republican Lt. Governor Bill Bolling and attorney general candidate Senator Ken Cuccinelli up by eight and nine points, respectively, further validating the point of view that the GOP ticket has a significant lead.

Who's right — those who say it's close or those who think the GOP is on its way? We won't know until election day. But Rasmussen does have a track record. According to a testimonial on its Web site, it "produces some of the most accurate and reliable polls in the country today." None other than Virginia politico guru Dr. Larry Sabato said it.

Virginia News Stand: September 10, 2009

Annotations & Elucidations Setting Trends

The News Stand is back after a bit of a late summer break. After all, nothing happens this time of year, anyway, right? So, we're getting right back into it with a pretty large News Stand. Leading off is an interesting bit of news breaking about the Democrat gubernatorial candidate, Senator Creigh Deeds. Seems back in the day, oh, about 10 years ago, he wrote some of his own thoughts on homosexuals. Uncovered by The Weekly Standard and reported by our friends at Bearing Drift.

But that's not all. Senator "Not Going To Run A Divisive Campaign" seems to have some out-of-control staff in Hampton Roads. Bearing Drift, again, with the details. Is this negativity a trend?

In fact, we have been e-mailed some pictures of dirty tricks in Buena Vista during the Labor Day Parade and we hope to have them up today.

Bearing Drift also has an update on several House races — let's not forget the House campaign — with a report on a negative mailer (yes, a trend) and interesting polling numbers on a seat held by a liberal Democrat in a district the GOP carries in statewide races, but which it has not been able to find traction on at the House level. Almost given up on, unexpectedly, it's back in play. A GOP pickup there would be huge. At the least, the numbers might dictate a reallocation of campaign dollars by state Dems to protect an incumbent, which would hurt their chances in other targeted districts. (By the way, congrats to BD — it's the first blog to lead off the News Stand.)

Oh, other than that? How about the budget cuts by the DNC Chairman, Governor Tim Kaine? Furloughs and layoffs for state employees and education cuts. Is this what the unions voted for four years ago?

Nationally, actress Patricia Mauceri claims she was fired from her long standing role because of her objection to her character becoming homosexual; the new civil rights movement, education choice, is drawing more attention in dramatic ways (as rights movements usually do); and the Obama administration's health care "reform" numbers are torn apart by the AP. Commentary features the always great Walter Williams and a thought-provoking piece on self-hate by Lisa Fabrizio. Meanwhile, Michael Barone and Bobby Eberle check up what passes for truth by the POTUS as well as his arrogance. 

News:

Deeds: "No Special Rights for Gays" (BearingDrift.com)

Deeds staff involved in sign defacement in Newport News? (BearingDrift.com)

Kaine: 593 layoffs, up to 15 percent college cuts (The Daily Press)

Kaine announces 593 layoffs, 2 prison closings, furloughs (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot)

Virginia to lay off nearly 600, Kaine says (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

House Update: Amiral tied with Miller in 87th; Comstock, Hugo, Scalley, McConville, Hyland updates (BearingDrift.com)

Mathieson negative at Labor Day — must be desperate (BearingDrift.com)

Deeds campaigns at VUU; Minn.'s Pawlenty helps out McDonnell (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Deeds TV ad pegged to McDonnell's thesis (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Scrutiny Spreads to '03 McDonnell Remarks (Washington Post)

National News:

Soap Actress Says She Was Fired Because of Religious Beliefs (FoxNews.com)

Voucher advocates face up to police (Washington Times)

Opposition to Health-Care Reform Revives Christian Right (Washington Post)

Obama disapproval on health care up to 52 percent (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Analysis:

Be quiet America, Washington knows best (Bobby Eberle/GOPUSA.com)

The Convenient Fantasies Of President Obama (Michael Barone/GOPUSA.com)

FACT CHECK: Obama uses iffy math on deficit pledge (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Commentary:

Inflation And Deficits (Walter Williams/GOPUSA.com)

The Limits Of Self-Hate (Lisa Fabrizio/GOPUSA.com)

Obama and The Joker  . . . So Much More than a Poster (Bobby Eberle/GOPUSA.com)

Open Questions To Senator Deeds

On the day after his blowout Democrat primary victory, Senator Creigh Deeds (D-25, Bath) said one of the differences between himself and Republican opponent, former Attorney General Bob McDonnell, is embryonic stem cell research: Deeds is for it, McDonnell is against it. Fair enough, senator. If you are for it, we invite you to reply, here, to this question:

If embryonic stem cell research is worthy of state funding, or any funding, it should produce results: Can you name just one successful medical/scientific breakthrough from embryonic stem cell research?

Furthermore, can you give a ballpark number on the actual, successful number of such breakthroughs from adult stem cell research?

Can you name two of the biggest, most prominent diseases that have perplexed scientists that now have been broken through because of adult stem cell research?

Finally, if you are going to "invest" our hard-earned tax money into something, shouldn't it be proven to work? And if it has proven not to work, how does that make you a good steward of our Commonwealth?

(Answers here.)

Virginia News Stand: May 11, 2009

The News Stand isn't the only one returning today: Looks like the missing Musketeer, Senator Creigh Deeds of Bath has finally poked his nose out in the Democrat gubernatorial primary campaign. He garners two headlines around the state today and prominent mentions elsewhere. Perhaps he's been there all along and we just didn't know it, as the Washington Post and Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star attest to the lackluster campaign thus far. But maybe Terry McAuliffe's comment on a Richmond radio station will perk things up. Dems also tell The Post they think dreariness and fatigue are what led to some Republican wins in their NoVa bastion as of late. In national news, the current governor's boss, the president, appears poised to take a page from Tim Kaine's policy book and eliminate abstinence education funding. Then there are the tales of two states and approaches to education: A California Senate committee passed what's being called "Gay Day" legislation for schools' curriculum where parents, according to one report, can't opt out their children. By contrast, Texas officials chose a prominent historian to restore basic and traditional lessons, that have slowly evaporated over the years, to its public school curriculum.  

News:

After GOP Wins, Democrats Are Worried About Fatigue (Washington Post)

Delegates urged to attend meeting (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

In the Race for Governor, a Drizzle of Ads Portends a Deluge (Washington Post)

Dems' primary appears lackluster (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)

Ousted GOP chairman takes aim at 'insiders' (The Daily Press

Deeds: Education, technology key (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)

Facing uphill battle in governor's race, Deeds still presses ahead (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

McAuliffe touts green energy (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)

Democrat to challenge incumbent in 6th District (Roanoke Times)

National News:

Obama would ax abstinence-only funding (OneNewsNow.com)

History scholar hopes to revamp Texas curriculum (OneNewsNow.com)

'Gay Day' Bill Passes California Senate Committee (CNSNews.com)

On Same-Sex Marriage: Deeds Flip-Flops, Moran Just Flops, And T-Mac Sounds Vaguely Sensible

See for yourself. From Saturday's Democrat gubernatorial debate in Williamsburg:

Senator Creigh Deeds apologizes for voting for the Marriage Amendment in the Virginia Senate, former Delegate Brian Moran proudly fights for same-sex marriage and implies conservatives are not for equal rights, and Terry McAuliffe says get over it!

Virginia News Stand: April 7, 2009

It's April so that means three things in Virgilankingnia politics: Veto Session, Shad Planking and campaigns in full swing. They usually coincide to some (or large) degree. But there's something different this year:  Gubernatorial candidate Senator Creigh Deeds (D-25, Bath) is avoiding the Shad Planking. That's almost unheard of for a statewide candidate. Who knows? If he wins the governorship, maybe it'll start a trend. Meanwhile, Governor Tim Kaine faces veto override threats on several bills, including those dealing with the death penalty and accepting strings-attached "stimulus" money for extended unemployment insurance — paid for by tax increases on business, since the fees it pays into that program fund it.

In another state's news that may have national implications, Iowans are fighting back against the edict by its supreme court inventing a "right" to same-sex "marriage." Also, Newt Gingrich talks, albeit briefly, about his conversion to Catholicism. Finally, check out one legal organization's unique avenue to challenge the federal bailout to AIG. 

News:

Kaine's vetoes facing his foes (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)

Deeds Will Not Speak At Shad Planking (Washington Post Virginia Politics Blog)

Big money flows to Virginia race for governor (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Deeds files petitions for Virginia governor's race (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot)

McDonnell calls for unity after leading ouster of party chairman (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Rejected GOP Chief To Run Again in Va. (Washington Post)

Battle over bingo laws in Va. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

National News:

Conservative Iowans fight to preserve traditional (OneNewsNow.com)

Does AIG Bailout Violate Establishment Cause? (OneNewsNow.com)

Gingrich tight-lipped on Catholic conversion (OneNewsNow.com)

UPDATE: Facebook And The Governor's Race (McDonnell's Lead Increases)

As we mentioned Friday, it's unusual for conservatives or Republicans to run ahead of the other side in the social marketing/technology aspects of campaigning. So, when the March issue of Richmond Magazine ran a blurb called "Facebook And The Governor's Race" that graphically illustrated Republican Bob McDonnell's commanding lead in Facebook supporters over all three of his potential Democrat opponents (see his blog here), it was a bit of a shock. I guess Terry McAuliffe's tech experience was limited to making money on Global Crossing while it went bankrupt (see Judicial Watch here). As we promised Friday, since there's no link to the RM site for this story, here's a scanned version of the hard copy. The totals were of February 13.

richmondmagazinefacebook

The graphic is entitled, "The Oracle of Facebook: Who's winning the gubernatorial race so far? We asked the online social-networking hub."

More shocking is that even with the Democrat candidates duly warned, McDonnell's lead increased. He now has 2,115 supporters (up from 1,713). T-Mac only inched up from 1,104 to 1,252, while the other Democrats, former Delegate Brian Moran and Senator Creigh Deeds, are neck and neck at 679 (from 585) and 678 (from 629), respectively.

 

Bill Of The Day/QOD Runner-Up: Wake Up Senator!

Today's Bill of the Day also generated a near-miss Quote of the Day. HB 2671, patroned by Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-15, Woodstock), is a bill that would recognize Page County as the "Cabin Capital of Virginia."  Senator Mark Obenshain (R-26, Harrisonburg), apparently carrying the bill on the Senate floor since he represents Page, found himself in the midst of a tortuous Q&A on the bill by Senator Creigh Deeds (D-25, Bath). Among the pressing matters the would-be governor wanted to know from the stand-in patron was "Does the gentleman know what goes on in cabins?" Any type of debate signals, even if not paying attention, that the bill clearly is not in the uncontested calendar.  

But enough was enough for Senator Donald McEachin (D-9, Henrico), who decided to take action:

Senator McEachin: "Mr. President, I request the bill be pulled from the uncontested block."

Lt. Governor Bill Bolling: "It has been pulled from the uncontested block. Are the Senators ready to vote? . . ."

Wake-up, big Don! The bill passed 20-17.