business leaders

Deeds: New Job = New Taxpayer

For perhaps the first time in this entire campaign, Creigh Deeds today stated very succinctly the primary difference in economic philosophy between statists (sometimes referred to as "liberals") and conservatives. At a meeting with business leaders in Richmond, Deeds said, "When you create a job, you create a taxpayer." Note that the first thing Deeds sees when someone gets a new job is an opportunity to TAX them! One can almost see him salivating at the potential for more money in the state coffers to spend to keep the unions and to the VEA neutralized. 

Conservatives, on the other hand, see a new job as an opportunity for someone to feed and take care of their families, a chance to make a better life for themselves and their loved ones, a step toward the American dream, a place to learn and develop a skill to be able to advance to even better employment opportunity, and a means to give philanthropically to their church and favorite charities to better society.

Finally, a clear statement from Mr. Deeds. Too bad for him that it reveals his true philosophy.

If Only Wagner's Revenue Projections Were As "Clear," Or, A Campaign Without Communication . . . Yet!

If you haven't heard it by now, and you want a good laugh, listen to Democrat lieutenant governor candidate Jody Wagner's interview this morning with WRVA's Richmond's Morning News host Jimmy Barrett (click here). Barrett gets right to the point and asks the former Kaine administration finance secretary about her missed revenue projections, which have resulted in consecutive budget deficits and multiple budget cuts. I'll give her some credit for her answer — she's at least learned something from the Obama administration, and that's the one thing it's good at: blame, blame and pass the buck, with a litany of boilerplate liberal excuses:

» It was the Bush administration's fault (at least twice);

» At least Virginia isn't as bad off as some other states (that'll make people feel secure);

» Passed the buck to economic forecasting agencies, business leaders and groups, and General Assembly leaders (how about that, Dick Saslaw?);

» But the 6.6 percent revenue growth projection in a slowing economy never gave her pause, even as many in the General Assembly warned the Kaine administration it was too high (she emphatically was "not overly optimistic"); and 

» Repeatedly said, "Let's be clear," (to the point where Barrett mockingly repeated it himself).

Not to mention her defensiveness when Barrett tried to loft her a softball about her campaign — she thought he was trying to blame her for the recession, for which she blamed George W. Bush (again).

All these excuses inevitably led to contradictions. Follow this bit of illogic: If it's the federal government's fault when things are bad, she must then credit it when things are good; if so, we have no reason for state government. So why is she running? She also got defensive when Barrett mentioned the recession came into focus a year ago, and rudely interrupted him to say she wasn't in office then, as well as when he simply asked how forecasts might be improved in the future.

But we still haven't heard the classics from her! Here goes:

On the grossly inaccurate revenue forecasts: 

"If I'm powerful enough to be personally responsible for that, then you want me to be your lieutenant governor."

Then, the absolute best for last: On the Public Policy Poll (a liberal pollster) that shows all three Democrats behind by double digits:

"The Democratic candidates have not yet begun communicating with the public yet and we will be doing that as the campaign moves along." 

So, that entire primary thing back in June was a what? Those television ads she ran . . . ? Those campaign appearances and interviews . . . ?

There you have it. It has nothing to do with her previous job performance, but that she and her ticket mates haven't yet communicated with the public. Don't worry, though. They plan on it. But with interviews like this, Ms. Wagner may want to delay that communication as long as possible.

Calling Homeschool Families: Want To Make A Difference?

We always have volunteer opportunities and, for homeschool families, we have a great one helping us run our booth at the HEAV Homeschool Convention, from Thursday, June 11 through Saturday, June 13.  The HEAV Convention booth hours are as follows:

5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 11

9:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. on Friday, June 12

9:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. on Saturday June 13 

Responsibilities and duties of volunteers:                                                               

  • Distributing General Assembly Report Cards.
  • Assist in non-partisan Voter Registration.
  • Obtain contact information from homeschool families.
  • We request a two-hour (or longer) shift.

If you are interested in volunteering your valued talent in order to advance the cause of traditional values in the Commonwealth, then please take a moment to e-mail Vanessa Strait vanessa.strait@tffaction.org or call her at (804) 343-0010.

This year's statewide elections (for governor lieutennant governor, attorney general and House of Delegates) will receive unprecedented national media attention. The Family Foundation is committed to its long-standing (since 1985) non-partisan leadership role of shaping critical public policy debates to help Virginia citizens, lawmakers and business leaders better understand and apply to law the principles of life, marriage, parental authority, constitutional government and religious liberty. Throughout the summer and fall we will have other volunteer opportunities for citizens who believe in standing firm for traditional values. Stay tuned.

We're Looking For More Than A Few Good People

Since 1985, The Family Foundation has been on the forefront of critical public policy debates helping Virginia citizens, lawmakers and business leaders better understand and apply to law the principles of life, marriage, parental authority, constitutional government and religious liberty. Non-profit and non-partisan, we are the Commonwealth's oldest and most influential family public policy organization. Our mission is to strengthen the family through accurate research and education, prompting civic activism and affecting public policy outcomes. The Family Foundation of Virginia is proud to be associated with Dr. James Dobson's Focus on the Family and its network of nearly forty independent state policy councils.

The entire country is focused on Virginia this year. Other than New Jersey, we are the only state that has statewide elections (for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and the entire House of Delegates). We will need ongoing assistance so we can distribute our 2008-09 General Assembly Report Card (to be made public within a couple of weeks) and other materials to help educate Christians and churches around the Commonwealth regarding the principles each candidate represents during this November's elections. While candidates campaign for votes, we will educate citizens on the principles these numerous  individuals represent.

To pull this off, we need you! We have various needs that can be fulfilled by middle school, high school (homeschoolers welcome!) or college students. These activities are perfect to meet community service requirements for graduation or for adults (such as retirees or stay-at-home-parents) who would enjoy assisting us in our mission. We can use help on a weekly, bi-monthly or monthly basis. Our headquarters is located across from the Capitol Square in downtown Richmond and we there is convenient parking. 

Some of the areas where we can use help include data entry and data base managment (basic computer skills) in office or at home; mailings (production and stuffing); and distributing General Assembly Report Cards and other items to churches. 

If interested in volunteering your valued talent in order to advance the cause of traditional values in the Commonwealth, then please contact Marie Edwards at marie@familyfoundation.org or call her at (804) 343-0010.

During this crucial time in our Commonwealth's and nation's history, we believe it is more important than ever to do whatever possible to secure the traditional values we hold dear and precious, while they are under heavy assault. Please consider helping us with what will be a rewarding experience.

Interview With Omarh Rajah: Part 1

There's been a lot of talk about "firsts" this campaign season. But it seems as if Chesterfield County was ahead of the curve last year when voters inits Matoaca District elected Omarh Rajah to its school board. He is the first African-American to hold that position and the first teacher elected from Matoaka. Running for office for the first time, Mr. Rajah unseated the entrenched incumbent, who happened to be the board chairman. He's also an unabashed conservative. Today we are pleased to begin a three-part interview with Mr. Rajah where we asked for his thoughts on a number of education issues, both local and statewide, from his perspective as a school board member of one of Virginia's largest public school systems. In fact, according to its Website, one of the 100 largest in the country. The interview, which was conducted via e-mail, will be posted today through Wednesday. All questions and answers appear as they were submitted.

Mr. Rajah, thank you for taking time out of your hectic schedule to take some questions from familyfoundation.org. We greatly appreciate you doing this. By the way, you are the first locally elected official to do an interview with us. Congratulations! ; - )

Ready for some questions? Here we go:

familyfoundation.org: When you won election last year, you won on a conservative, traditional values platform in a year that wasn't supposed to be good for conservatives. Yet you unseated the incumbent chairman of all people in your first-ever run for office. What does that say about candidates running on those issues and/or office holders keeping their promises and voting conservative once elected?

Omarh Rajah: First of all, I'd like to thank The Family Foundation for asking me to participate in this interview. Pro-family voters and volunteers made up the backbone of my campaign last year, so it's wonderful to be able to share with you what's happened during my first six months in office.

This is a great question. I think what my election last year shows is that voters respond favorably to traditional conservative values. The key for candidates who support those values is to articulate them clearly for voters to understand what we believe in. In my campaign, that meant a relentless focus on knocking on doors to let voters know I was running to restore morals, values, and principles to our school system (my campaign called me the MVP candidate). It also meant tapping into the incredible network of conservative, pro-family volunteers to knock on doors with me, and it also meant raising the money to send out mail pieces to communicate that message to voters. In a nutshell, we as pro-family conservatives have the right message, we just can't be afraid to communicate it. One thing that proves that is that I carried the traditionally Democratic precinct of Ettrick by about 300 votes, and I did it with the exact same message I talked about everywhere else in the district. The key was that, unlike a lot of candidates in the past, I spent time in Ettrick talking to voters and spreading the message we believe in.

familyfoundation.org: To hear big-government advocates, money is the only thing that matters when it comes to creating a good educational environment. Is money the most important piece of the puzzle? If not, what is, or are, the most/some of the other most important factors?

Omarh Rajah: The most important factor in creating a quality educational system is the involvement of people, starting with parents. Beyond parents, though, it's vital that we attract and retain the highest quality teachers and administrators, both with enough money, but also with a strong, supportive work environment in which they feel their contributions are truly valued. It also takes the support of leaders in the community, be it political leaders, business leaders, civic leaders, etc. That helps create a real sense in the community, and among our children, that education is important to their future and is something they should care about. Children will follow the example adults set for them.

familyfoundation.org: How important is educational choice — such as charter schools, tax credits for private schools, public school choice and keeping home education from getting over regulated — in improving education? Are we doing enough and what will you try to do in Chesterfield to improve choice?

Omarh Rajah: I support choice in our school system. I strongly believe parents should have the right to decide what educational setting is best for their children, be it public schools, private schools, or home schooling, and our government needs to make it easier, rather than harder, for parents to make the choice that's right for their family. On a policy level, one way to accomplish that is for the money to follow the child, in other words, for parents who feel private schools or home schooling is best for their child to receive tax credits to offset their educational expenses. As a member of the School Board, my job is to make sure our public schools are as strong as possible for those children whose parents feel that is the best option. I believe strongly in public education. I'm a product of public schools, as is my wife, and our children are both in Chesterfield County Public Schools. That's why I ran for the School Board — to make sure our Public Schools here in Chesterfield are as strong as possible for my children and for all the other children whose parents have chosen that option.

familyfoundation.org: Virginia's charter school law is very limited. Other states have a wide ranging approach. What would you like to see done to improve and expand charter schools in Virginia?

Omarh Rajah:In Chesterfield, we have high school specialty centers that draw students who, in addition to taking the traditional high school curriculum, also have certain interests and wish to study those interests with other students who share them. For example, one high school has a technology focus, another has a pre-engineering focus, etc. These schools draw students from all over the county, not just those who live within that school district. I think that's a tremendous idea that other large school systems with multiple high schools should seriously consider if they are not already doing so. While these are not the same as charter schools, I believe they provide a real option to help students get the best possible educational experience. With regards to charter schools, I believe that they are an option school systems should consider for students who are struggling in their current environment. Any changes to existing law would probably need to be done at the state legislative level, but I would do all I could personally to support those efforts.