states

Repeal Amendment In Senate Sub-Committee Tomorrow Morning!

Tomorrow morning, in the same meeting Senate P&E sub-committee meeting that will vote on the property rights resolution, senators will consider SJR 280, the Repeal Amendment. As we wrote here in one of our General Assembly previews, this would help restore the checks and balances once enjoyed between the federal government and the states by giving the states power to repeal any federal law if two-thirds of the states vote to do so. The resolution is patroned by Senator Ryan McDougle (R-4, Hanover). It will be heard in the Senate Privileges and Elections Sub-Committee on Constitutional Amendments (click here), and we encourage you to contact members of that committee to vote in favor of the resolution.

Cuccinelli Schools Clueless Demagogue Chris Matthews

Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli appeared on MSNBC's Hardball with Chris Matthews Thursday night to discuss the proposed Repeal Amendment (see Norfolk Virginian-Pilot), a mechanism that would allow two-thirds of the states to nullify a federal law or regulation (see Speaker Bill Howell's op-ed at Cato.org). Because A) he utterly disassembled Matthews, as he did Eliot "Client Number 9" Spitzer a couple of weeks ago on CNN, and B) because no one watches MSNBC, we thought we'd post the video for your entertainment. These things often are painful to watch. The liberal, in this case Matthews, either cannot grasp the issues and/or ignores them and makes, as the Attorney General accurately states, "assumptions" to suit his argument. In other words, the old leftist tactic of putting his negative words in your mouth and trying to force you to defend the absurd proposition. In this case, Matthews continue to ram the proposition that anyone who favors the repeal amendment was appealing to Johnny Reb and the redneck South. Nevermind that the U.S. Constitution was created by the states for the states, not to cede every element of life to a small band of federal government bureaucrats.

Never fear. Attorney General Cuccinelli would have nothing of it and, in the process, took apart and exposed the visibly disgusted Matthews — who plainly indicated his elitist belief that only Washington, D.C., can make good decisions — and revealed him as both of the above: clueless and a demagogue.

Update: The AG is saying tonight that the federal court ruling on the constitutionality of Obamacare will be issued Monday. Stay tuned. If he has a news conference, we will be there to cover it.

Enjoy the video (9:05):

A little knowledge is dangerous, Chris. Perhaps a little preparation next time? Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli takes apart elitist Chris Matthews. 

The 10th Amendment Disconnect

I had the privilege of hearing Dr. Bob Holsworth (Virginia Tomorrow) speak Monday night about the recent elections. He is the best political analyst in Virginia in my opinion and his insights on campaigns and strategies never fail to enlighten. He said that one of the many aspects where the Creigh Deeds campaign (as well as the Wagner and Shannon campaigns) fell short was in its inability to respond to the federal issues — card check, cap-and-trade, nationalized health care — Republican Bob McDonnell repeatedly raised as not only an intrusion into Virginians' sovereignty, but as harmful to Virginians themselves —their prosperity, opportunity, way of life, health. In other words, upholding the 10th Amendment, which leaves to the states all powers not specifically delineated to the federal government.

Senator Deeds couldn't dis President Barack Obama, who historically carried Virginia last year, and turn off the liberal Democrat base and its newly energized voters, by opposing those signature liberal issues. So the best he could do was assert they had nothing to do with running the commonwealth. Dr. Holsworth said Deeds' inability to satisfactorily deal with this dynamic pleased no one — crucial independents, who broke overwhelmingly to the GOP, nor the base.

Who am I to disagree with Dr. Bob? But I want to add that it was more than that. Defending one's state against the onslaught of the federal leviathan is a constitutional charge. So it is a legitimate issue. But Senator Deeds, reflective of today's ingrained liberalism, at the very least couldn't respond to the issues because he doesn't understand the 10th Amendment. Doubtful. So that leaves the worst, but more likely, case — a total disregard for it. When state politicians become too comfortable accepting mandates and force-fed programs from Washington, which stunt states from their roles as democratic laboratories and distinctly different places to live, they deserve to lose. Indeed, federal issues always have and always will be integral to state issues because the constitutional relationship of states to the national government demands it.  

Virginia News Stand: September 30, 2009

Annotations & Elucidations  Virginia Borrows Now; IOUs Next?

Who said Virginia isn't for borrowers? We've always prided ourselves on being different than the federales. In Virginia, we balance our budgets. In Virginia, we don't use gimmicks. Of course, states can't print money, but they sure can borrow it. In Virginia's case, it's more than $1.2  billion worth, or the size of a potential Creigh Deeds tax increase. Whatever happened to the "Best Managed State"? This is what Senator Deeds wants to "continue"? First, it was California-style state employee furloughs. Now it's federal government-style borrowing. What's next? Left coast-style IOUs?  

If that wasn't enough, the Dems in Washington now are considering shielding banks from state laws. So much for federalism and that constitution thing. Finally, be sure to check out Michelle Malkin's exclusive on the President Obama's friends and their Olympic connections. Nothing like having a friend in high places lobby your case for the Olympics.

News:

Va. To borrow up to $1.27 billion for unemployment payments (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Bolling Vows Fiscal Reform (Harrisonburg Daily News-record)

Polls find competing results for campaigns (Northern Virginia Daily)

A Tug of War For Women's Votes in Race For Governor (Washington Post)

Holton backs Deeds; Republicans talk mental health (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Deeds happy with Holton endorsement (Roanoke Times)

Paths diverge over budget, roads in 17th District debate (Roanoke Times)

November election voter registration deadline nears (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

5th hopeful from GOP runs for 5th (Charlottesville Daily Progress)

National News:

More thorny challenges ahead for health overhaul (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Dems debate sheilding banks from state laws (AP/GOPUSA.com)

Analysis:

Virginia's Regional Divide on the Issues (Jennifer Agiesta/Washington Post Voices Blog)

In Virginia Culture Wars Look Very Much Alive (Stuart Rothenberg/Rothenberg Political Report Blog)

Commentary:

All The President's Olympic Cronies (Michelle Malkin/GOPUSA.com)

Health Care and the Constitution . . . Remember that Document? (Bobby Eberle/GOPUSA.com)

Coming: The Economic "W" (Dick Morris and Eileen McGann/GOPUSA.com)

Is Disagreement With Obam Racism? (Walter E. Williams/GOPUSA.com)

Pittsburgh Protest Promoters (Brent Bozell/GOPUSA.com)