taxpayer

Deeds: New Job = New Taxpayer

For perhaps the first time in this entire campaign, Creigh Deeds today stated very succinctly the primary difference in economic philosophy between statists (sometimes referred to as "liberals") and conservatives. At a meeting with business leaders in Richmond, Deeds said, "When you create a job, you create a taxpayer." Note that the first thing Deeds sees when someone gets a new job is an opportunity to TAX them! One can almost see him salivating at the potential for more money in the state coffers to spend to keep the unions and to the VEA neutralized. 

Conservatives, on the other hand, see a new job as an opportunity for someone to feed and take care of their families, a chance to make a better life for themselves and their loved ones, a step toward the American dream, a place to learn and develop a skill to be able to advance to even better employment opportunity, and a means to give philanthropically to their church and favorite charities to better society.

Finally, a clear statement from Mr. Deeds. Too bad for him that it reveals his true philosophy.

Virginia News Stand: April 29, 2009

Looks like the the governor got a little jealous of his boss in Washington and issued his own threat assessment, which demonized several groups, as did the federal manifesto. A college professor often told us, "Never generalize. It'll get you in trouble some day." Some never learn from even the most basic of life lessons. The report knocked the gubernatorial campaign off the radar a bit, which probably didn't win Governor Kaine any thanks from his would-be Democrat successors. But below we have some reports on the increasing acrimony of the Dem candidates toward each other. Are they a threat to anyone (other than the taxpayer)? But the Kaine administration report is very appropriately timed as people increasingly are concerned about the total takeover and make over of the country by the Obama administration, and you dare note complain. For example, read about how the very 1984 so-called "hate crimes" bill looks destined to get ram-rodded through the House, and possibly into law. Sandy Rios writes in detail about the totality of the liberals' grand scheme. 

The Miss USA debacle continues to be discussed. Andrew Breitbart has a blunt commentary about the viciousness of homosexual activists who are anything but the tolerant they say they are, or who want anything but the tolerance they say they seek. Meanwhile, a pro-life leader, herself a former Miss Delaware, says she's proud of Miss California, Carrie Prejean (who attends a Christian college). We also have an article and video of D.C. ministers rallying in favor of traditional marriage and against same-sex marriage, which the D.C. government is contemplating.

Lastly, the much publicized polling that says evangelical Christians are all of a sudden tree-hugging-greenies has been debunked. A study of the phrasing of the questions proves they were designed to provoke answers to fit the pre-conceived template of the organization sponsoring the poll.  

Admin's note: The News Stand may be intermittent the next 10 days or so as the Communications Department, who compiles the articles that make up much of the News Stand, takes a well-deserved vacation.

News:

Kaine orders investigation of report on terrorism threats (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot)

State terrorism report concerns university officials, rights watchdogs (The Daily Press)

Va. Democrats debate words vs. actions (Washington Times)

Democrats' Digs Deepen as Forums Continue (Washington Post)

Major Front in Va. Race Is Online (Washington Post)

National News:

'Hate crimes' bill likely to pass House, thanks to Dems (OneNewsNow.com)

Climate-change report on evangelicals debunked (OneNewsNow.com)

Pro-life leader proud of Miss California (OneNewsNow.com)

Commentary:

We're here, we're queer and we're hypocrites (Andrew Breitbart/Washington Times)

American Left attempts a bloodless coup (Sandy Rios/OneNewsNow.com)

Video:

Ministers Lead Protest of D.C. Legislation (Washington Post

Truth In Reporting: The Special Tax Session

Governor Tim Kaine surprised absolutely no one when he rolled out his transportation — er, make that tax — plan Monday. It includes nearly $1 billion tax and fee increases under the guise of fixing transportation for what he and the media mistakenly call a transportation special session of the General Assembly to begin June 23. Truth in reporting requires us to call it a Special Tax Session. Governor Kaine's plan doesn' leave out much. It increases the sales tax in Hampton Roads and Northern Virginia from 5 to 6 percent, something rejected by voters in those regions in 2002. Governor Kaine also would have us pay more for cars by increasing from 3 to 4 percent the motor-vehicle titling tax as well as another $10 increase in the cost to register our vehicles. Governor Kaine doesn't stop there: He also proposes an increase in the grantor's, or property seller's tax, of 10 cents per $100, just as the real estate market is tanking. Detect a theme here?

How anyone can fathom adding a tax to house sales right now, on top of the fee for mortgage and refinance originations as part of former Democrat Governor Mark Warner's 2004 record tax increase? (By the way, does he like his successor's plan?) What does this show of Governor Kaine's understanding of basic economics? Why do he and other liberals complain about getting branded as big taxers and spenders when they thoughtlessly and reflexively propose more tax increases for every problem (real or imagined)? The fact that spending cuts and prioritizing never seriously are considered shows a true lack of imagination, leadership and courage.

There are at least two reasons why we do not support increasing taxes for "fixing transportation." One is the lack of a constitutional amendment to protect Virginia's Transportation Trust Fund from being raided. The other is the depression era law that controls how Virginia funds its transportation needs. Until those two issues are resolved, Virginians should not be asked to send more money to Richmond to fund a broken system.

It is a misnomer that conservatives are anti-tax. We're anti-tax increases when taxpayer money is wasted on useless programs that often are counterproductive, when taxpayer money is not used for constitutional purposes, when politicians want to start new programs (especially during a shaky economy) to buy their "legacy" (pre-K, anyone?), and when government is so big and bloated that waste and abuse are rampant. When spending is cut in real terms and re-prioritized, and only constitutional functions of government are funded, then let's talk about taxes.