terrorism

From Of All Places, The ACLU: Another Reason To Oppose ObamaCare

The ACLU produced this a few years ago as a protest as to what it thought was an invasion of privacy by the Bush administration in its attempt to fight terrorism. However, ironic karma has it that it's a much better prognosticator of what ObamaCare will do if it is wrought upon us. You think the health police and White House snitch Web sites (see John Rosenthal at The American Spectator)  are bad now, just try ordering a pizza in 2012. Come to think of it, why isn't the ACLU opposing ObamaCare?

Fat taxes, instant background checks, telling you what to eat, buy and how much is good for you, brought to you (graciously, of course) by ObamaCare. It's for your own good, after all.

Threat Assessment

Yet another government agency, this time the Virginia State Police, has issued a terrorism assessment report that includes concerns over Christian conservatives. You remember that earlier this month the U.S. Department of Secret Police Homeland Security issued a report to law enforcement agencies across the country warning them about the threat of military veterans, pro-lifers, etc. Now, we have a report right here in the old Commonwealth, you know that place that was started by "anti-government types," that alleges Christian colleges, along with predominantly black universities, as potential hotbeds of terrorism. The Va. State Police report has even raised the ire of Governor Kaine, protector of free speech (as long as it doesn't include publicly saying the name of Jesus, of course). He issued a statement criticizing the report and has ordered an investigation of the investigation.

Now, the left will have you believe that all us pro-life graduates of Christian colleges are simply being paranoid. But what's the old saying? It's not paranoia if they really are out to get you.

Republican Moral Divide

A quick look at Barak Obama's campaign web site finds several references to faith and values. Unfortnately, there doesn't appear to be any such reference on John McCain's site.  This, while a new Gallop poll indicates that Republican voters are growing more concerned over the state of the nation's moral values. In just two years, the percent of registered Republicans who said the moral condition of American is "poor" has risen by 15 points. Today, 51 percent of the GOP is frustrated with the nation's moral climate, compared to 36 percent two years ago.

So, Republican voters appear to be more concerned about traditional values — not less. As such, these voters are more likely to seek out candidates who they believe share their concerns. Apparently, McCain and his advisors still don't get it.

And its not just Republican voters with concerns. Since 2002, Republicans, Democrats and Independents have grown more pessimistic about the nation's moral direction. In fact, 81 percent believe the nation's moral state is "getting worse."

So, in that context, how smart is it for McCain and other Republicans to avoid talking about moral issues? While their campaign consultants may convince candidates to avoid all talk about marriage and abortion, that appears to be exactly what the voters (and activists) want them talking about. 

Don't get me wrong. Candidates can't talk only about moral issues. They have to address rising gas prices, the economy, Iraq, terrorism, etc. But they can't completely avoid moral issues either.

The message to Republican candidates is clear — avoid these issues at your peril. Don't expect the activists and voters who got you into office to be energized if you refuse to even mention the issues they care about.