unborn children

The Real Gender Gap

As the Democrat convention begins in Charlotte, N.C., today, the rhetoric is flying fast and furious from the abortion industry, its apologists in the media and the Obama campaign. Its primary message is, of course, the so-called "war on women," which in this case means anything that limits the industry's profits from ending the lives of unborn children. If the abortion-related commercials the Obama campaign is airing in Virginia are any indication, facts and reality are not going to be part of their message. As a woman, I'm embarrassed that anyone of my sex would be so naïve as to fall for such partisan drivel, and allow themselves to be reduced to nothing more than a token of political gamesmanship.

But while the Democrat Party plans to parade the abortion industry's most partisan radicals across its stage this week — from Cecile Richards of Planned Parenthood to Nancy Keenan of NARAL to Sandra Fluke, famous for demanding that others pay for her sex life — whose messages will no doubt have the national media tripping over themselves with delight, there's another story coming out of Charlotte that has some feminist leaders a bit flummoxed. Apparently, for the DNC, it might be all about the 'women," but that is apparently limited to the women without children.

You see, the Democrat Party has a new rule that prohibits children from its convention, which has even the most ardent feminists in a tizzy. Some chapters of the National Organization of Women have sent a tersely worded letter to Democrat leaders chastising them for the rule. Feminist icon Gloria Steinem put it bluntly: "It is both right and smart for the Democratic Convention to behave as if children exist."

At least the ones lucky enough to have been a "choice" their mothers can live with.

Planned Parenthood protestors at the Republican convention in Tampa, however, seem just fine with the no kids rule. One lamented that Republican women are just "baby making machines" and "have so many kids," and others who dismissed women who might vote for a Republican as just doing "what their husbands and preachers" tell them to do. (Explicit language warning: Watch video here at the Media Research Center).

All this comes on the heels of several polls regarding the so-called "gender gap" showing that President Obama holds a commanding lead with single women without children, but that gap disappears among married women with children. Some are calling it the "marriage gap."

That should come as no surprise to anyone. Obviously, as we get married and have children, priorities change. Generally, we begin putting others, especially our families, ahead of ourselves. It's called growing up. Some do so even before marriage, but for others it requires more time, and the introduction of responsibility for others.

Which is why, once again, despite all the rhetoric coming from both parties, both campaigns, and some pundits, this election isn't completely about economics. It's about families.

That's something the Democrat Party simply doesn't understand. But, if Republicans want to take advantage, they better start recognizing it as well.

General Assembly Issue One: Life Defined And Protected

This is the first in a series about key issues facing this year's General Assembly.

Last year, The Family Foundation successfully advocated for the passage of one of our top priority bills: the "Baby Bill." While the "Baby Bill" closed a loophole in Virginia law that previously allowed the killing of a child just moments after birth, this year we hope to build on that success by taking the protection of life one step further with the passage of legislation that would create a wrongful death statute for the unborn.

The Wrongful Death bill (HB 1440, the Senate bill has yet to be numbered) patroned by Delegate Bob Marshall (R-13, Manassas) and Senator Jill Holtzman Vogel (R-27, Winchester) would provide protection for the unborn in cases where they lose their life due to negligence of another.

While Virginia's Code does include a fetal homicide law, the same unborn life, taken without intention, or premeditation, elicits no penalty. Improving our law to provide for a civil penalty in the cases of fetal manslaughter is essential.

Virginia's current wrongful death law operates in accordance with the "born alive rule." The born alive rule dates back to a 1940s federal court decision declaring that a child could recover damages for injury caused in utero once they were born. By extension, if a baby is born alive (though sometimes barely and only through artificial means) and then dies, a parent can then pursue a wrongful death cause of action for the injury in utero.

Approximately 40 states have gone beyond the born alive rule and now allow for pre-birth wrongful death suits for injury caused to a fetus while in utero. The Wrongful Death bill would bring Virginia in line with current law in the vast majority of states. It defines life as beginning at conception and therefore has the practical effect of expanding the state's wrongful death statue to encompass all unborn children. After all, an unborn life is not only of value when it is wanted by the mother or when its life is intentionally taken by another.

Statement From The Virginia Society For Human Life On The 4th Circuit’s Upholding Of Virginia’s Partial Birth Abortion Ban

OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF THE VIRGINIA SOCIETY FOR HUMAN LIFE ON THE RULING BY THE 4TH U.S. CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS UPHOLDING VIRGINIA'S LAW BANNING PARTIAL BIRTH ABORTION

The Virginia Society for Human Life applauds the decision of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals today which upheld by a vote of 6 to 5 Virginia's Partial Birth Infanticide Ban. This vital piece of pro-life legislation protects the lives of unborn children from the gruesome procedure known as "partial birth abortion." During such an abortion a living late term unborn baby is partially removed from his/her mother's womb and the skull is punctured allowing the baby's brains to be sucked out.

The procedure also puts the baby's mother at grave risk of future complications both physical and psychological. It is a clear victory for the lives of babies and their mothers in Virginia that the Court has upheld this reasonable and important law.

"There is no doubt that the Virginia's Partial Birth Abortion Infanticide Ban will save the lives of hundreds of Virginia babies from this horrible and violent procedure. The mothers of these children deserve medical care that respect and protect their lives as well, rather then subject them to the dangers of abortion. Partial birth abortion is a deadly act that the people of Virginia have rightly rejected through the General Assembly and the Court was correct to uphold this important law," said Olivia Gans, president of the Virginia Society for Human Life.

VSHL is very grateful for the leadership of the office Attorney General of Virginia, in particular Mr. Bob McDonnell for successfully guiding this issue through the courts during his term of office.