woodbridge virginia

Breaking News: McDonnell Tells Fairfax Registrar To Count The Military's Votes!

The U.S. Military doesn't fight and die overseas to protect our freedoms so that unscrupulous people in power back home can deny them their own constitutional rights.

When the news first broke late last week that the grossly partisan Fairfax County registrar, Rokey Suleman (contact here), was not going to count absentee ballots by military personnel, we were livid. This same man registered Fairfax County Jail inmates to vote earlier this month. (Why not? Captive audience, right?) But he wanted to deny the votes of hundreds of Virginians who are abroad fighting for our (including his) security and freedom. The gall of this man!

From the D.C. Examiner:

Inmates at the Fairfax County jail were encouraged to register and vote last week by (Democrat) elections officials making what the county's (Democrat) sheriff called the first visit of its kind in his 30 years with the county. 

We were ready to blog about this absolute gross injustice — first brought to the public's attention by Delegates Bill Janis (R-56, Glen Allen) and Scott Lingamfelter (R-31, Woodbridge), both military veterans (Delegate Lingamfelter was a tank colonel in the Gulf War) — when we just received a news release from the office of Attorney General Bob McDonnell announcing that he has written and issued an opinion that tells Mr. Suleman to shape up and count the votes! (Norfolk Virginian-Pilot article, here.) Delegate Janis last week officially requested the opinion from Attorney General McDonnell — himself a vet and whose daughter has been deployed to Iraq.  

At issue was a minor technicality (Richmond Times-Dispatch article, here) that no Virginia registrar had ever considered an impediment to the counting of the votes of overseas military personnel, especially since a federal law allows military personnel a waiver for the particular circumstance in question. Yet, Mr. Suleman, the jailbird cherry picker, proposed to be the first to ignore the federal law. (Human Events article here).

Another irony: Fairfax County is the home to George Washington. Fine way of continuing the tradition, Mr. Suleman, of respecting the U.S. Military, which your county's most famous citizen did so much to form.

Meanwhile, where was Governor Tim Kaine on this issue? Not a peep. Isn't he Barack Obama's national co-chairman? Coincidence in his silence? We can tell you that besides travelling the country to campaign for liberal Democrats while the commonwealth's finances are falling apart, Governor Kaine was busy restoring felons' voting rights at such a dizzying rate that one wonders if he has diligently reviewed their applications. At this point last year he had restored a record 729 felons voting rights outdone only by this year's blistering pace of 758, per Delegate Janis on WRVA radio Friday afternoon.

The right to vote is a cherished value in our country. Actions by Mr. Suleman and the governor, not to mention renegade groups such as ACORN (see the CNN column of Tara Wall, deputy editorial page editor of The Washington Times), devalue the votes of all law abiding citizens and the brave men and women in uniform who constantly defend us and our freedoms.

Posted below is the news release issued by the office of Attorney General Bob McDonnell. The link to the opinion itself is at the conclusion of the statement. 

McDonnell Opinion: Count Absentee Military Ballots

Opinion Finds Federal Law Preempts State Law; Federal Ballots without Witness Address Are Lawful, Must be Counted

Fairfax — Attorney General Bob McDonnell released a formal opinion today concluding that federal absentee ballots from overseas military voters lacking the printed name and address of a witness must be counted. The opinion affirms that federal law preempts state law, thus clarifying the state and federal statutes regarding the issue. The confusion centered over whether a state law requiring a witness's printed name and address controls federal absentee ballots or the federal law governs this issue. The opinion was requested by Delegate Bill Janis (R-Henrico) and is attached to this release.

In the formal opinion the Attorney General finds, "It is . . . my opinion that the applicable provision of Virginia law, § 24.2-702.1(B), interpreted to require an overseas military voter submitting only a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot to include the printed name and address of the person who signs the witness statement is preempted by the provisions of the (federal) Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act. Finally, it is my opinion that general registrars may not reject a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot submitted by overseas military voters for the November 4, 2008 federal election that does not include a printed name and address for the person who signs the witness statement. ..."

Approximately 100 Federal Write-In Absentee Ballots have been set aside in Fairfax County pending a legal conclusion regarding the discrepancy between state and federal law. Additional Federal Write-In Absentee Ballots may also have been received in other jurisdictions. The Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot is most commonly used by members of the military who are stationed overseas and have not received a state absentee ballot. It is a means by which service members can be guaranteed a vote in federal elections.

A copy of this formal opinion was provided to the State Board of Elections this afternoon.

Click here for Attorney General McDonnell's official seven page opinion.

The Same "Just One Question" For House Republicans

As The Special Tax Session of the General Assembly was about to get underway, we posed one question we said we'd love Governor Tim Kaine to answer. Now that House Republicans, or at least some of them, are getting behind HB 6055, which would raise numerous onerous taxes in Hampton Roads and Northern Virginia (such as the real-estate killing grantor's tax), we want to pose to them the same question:

Before we go raising taxes for a bloated government to pave over the Commonwealth by taking more money from people already finding it tough to get by, shouldn't we first spend the $500 million in new money still around from last year's transportation bill?

Okay, it's worded slightly differently, but it's the same question, and rightfully posed as the bill's patron, Delegate Phil Hamilton (R-93, Newport News) today cited that same pot of money of new funding on "Richmond's Morning News with Jimmy Barrett" on WRVA-AM/1140. Despite the House Republican leadership's public statements about fixing the parts ruled unconstitutional from last year's bill, it doesn't seem to have the whole team reading from the same playbook.

New Republican Party of Virginia Chairman, and Delegate, Jeff Frederick (R-52, Woodbridge), told the blog Tertium Quids:

. . . he plans not only to vote against HB 6055, but to make the case, in his role as party chairman, that tax hikes such as this make little policy sense while also harming the GOP brand.

What does it say about the bill's policy and those well-meaning legislators who want to do something "to make the issue go away" when the party's chairman, and a colleague of the patron, is adamantly against it? Who was elected statewide most recently and has heard from the grassroots? Not only that, but statewide and regional polling makes it pretty clear: No new taxes will be tolerated, no matter what they're called, how they're imposed or what it's for. Delegate Frederick is not the only one concerned. Senator Ken Cuccinelli (R-37, Fairfax), who also has traveled the state much recently in his bid for attorney general, told TQ:

"I'm very concerned that the Republican tax bill will pass, further enraging our already-dispirited base over what they will perceive as an abandonment of Republican principles — again."

Partisans may think this split in the ranks is bad. Taxpayers, perhaps otherwise, since it gives us hope of defeating a massive tax hike (however "regional" in nature) — never good, and particularly disastrous in these uncertain economic times. So, we ask again, to House Republicans — and, for that matter, Senate Democrats, Senate Republicans, House Democrats, Governor Kaine and anyone else who will have a say in the matter:

Shouldn't we first spend what we already have?

 

Congrats Tertium Quids

We like to think this lil' ol' Internet-age broadsheet of ours has made a lot of progress in about eight-and-a-half months. It has. But nothing like the even younger Tertium Quids blog. We admit we're partial to Norman Leahy's prose and the general way of thinking there and at its sister organization, The Virginia Institute for Public Policy, but there's no denying the run they're on. A couple weeks ago they started podcasts with great interviews with newsmakers such as Senator Ken Cuccinelli (R-37, Fairfax), Attorney General Bob McDonnell, Lieutenant Governor Bill Bolling and new Republican Party of Virginia Chairman, Delegate Jeff Frederick (R-52, Woodbridge).

Then, yesterday, at the monthly Tuesday Morning Group meeting, sponsored by VIPP, TQ blog maestro Leahy announced plans for a weekly Web-streamed radio show, featuring guests and caller questions. News to follow here as it gets closer to launch. We've always looked forward to reading TQ's point-of-view. Now we're equally excited about hearing it.