Years ago, parents taught their children about the birds and the bees. Parents picked the timing and parents picked the method. But in the last couple of decades schools have usurped that role, declaring parents incompetent. While there may be a few parents who have fallen down on this important job, there was no need to assume the worst, make policy for the lowest common denominator and suffocate families with more state control over their children. Now the state's indoctrinational reach is moving toward one without limits. That's because some California educators and public health "professionals" have found a new method to "teach" our children — wireless technology.  Not surprisingly, the San Francisco Health Department is launching this new affront to parents with tools such as video podcasts, 3-D computer games and text messaging to spread its "comprehensive sex education" message. Seemingly another California trend today, given our fight to keep abstinence education available in Virginia, expect this bypass of parental authority in the Old Dominion soon.

William Neville is the manager of marketing and new media for the left-wing, pro-homosexual rights Advocates for Youth, which promotes teenage sexual activity. His unrestrained enthusiasm for the project made no pretense of concealing the project's intentions. He said, "There's still nothing better than high-quality, comprehensive sex education in school, but with abstinence-only programs, the ball is getting dropped and the Internet is able to pick it up." 

All that said, it may behoove advocates of abstinence education to design their own tech-based programs. Combining the positive message of abstinence with new methods of delivering the information could be a powerful tool in an ever muddled society of mixed messages, cultural ambiguity toward moral standards, right and wrong, and time-tested truth.