We're not lawyers, but here's what we think is some sound legal advice based on the recent course of action by Richmond Commonwealth's Attorney Michael Herring. Referring to his decision not to prosecute four former employees of Commonwealth Catholic Charities who aided and assisted an underage Guatemalan girl with an abortion by signing a form they had no authority to sign (never mind the abortionist who apparently was all too eager to perform the abortion without any verification of the signer's legal status) because he did not find "criminal intent": The next time someone is charged in the city of Richmond with a moving vehicle violation (speeding, reckless driving, running a red light) or any other charge or crime where the proof of intent cannot be proved short of Mr. Spock's Vulcan Mind Meld, simply tell the judge you had no purpose in mind and submit as evidence no better source than Mr. Herring's own quote about intent.

After all, if you hit someone's car and wreck your own, it's pretty obvious you didn't want to damage your car, much less have to pay to repair someone else's. Seems intent there is harder to prove than the conscious decision to sign a form claiming you had legal guardianship of a 16-year-old immigrant.

Of course this example is a bit absurd. But no less absurd than his decision to forsake such an obvious breech of the law.