Sitting, Friday, through two House Appropriation sub-committees as well as the full-committee until about 6:30, when I should well have been home for a change, something hit me: It's great the Appropriations Committee is so concerned about bills that have new spending attached and rejects them. We're in a deficit, after all. In fact, it's not just this year, but the committee has a justifiably earned miserly reputation. So, you won't get too much criticism out of me for that. No new spending! Sounds like a campaign slogan. But what about the old spending? Why does that continue to rise? Where is the committee's diligence to keeping the old spending down? In short, why has the budget grown 80 percent during the last 10 years?  

We also ask, if the committee is committed to limiting the growth of government, why it blocks reforms designed to stymie the ever growing  leviathan, such as zero-based budgeting? (See HB 2356, from Delegate Todd Gilbert, here.)