Now that Brian Moran has launched his first television advertising attack on Terry McAuliffe, on the issue of McAuliffe's role in the bankruptcy of Global Crossing and his subsequent profiting of it by the millions of dollars (see Washington Post via Staunton News Leader), will the Democrat gubernatorial candidate follow-up with an attack ad on T-Mac's equally suspicious role in a sleazy Teamsters union money laundering scandal? It's a truly sordid affair, resulting in the conviction of the Teamsters president and other union officials. The cynic might say it was in keeping with Teamsters tradition, but it resulted in a "do-over" election that led to current Teamsters boss James P. Hoffa, son of the mysteriously done-in, and presumably late, former Teamsters boss of Giants Stadium lore.

It's a tale that amazingly has been largely laid quiet by Moran and the other Democrat in the primary field, Senator Creigh Deeds (although we've mentioned it prominently before). As someone who, at the time, worked for a company targeted by the Teamsters, this is where I first heard the name Terry McAuliffe. Suffice it to say, he was implicated in a fundraising scheme where the Teamsters doled out cash to organizations in return for individual contributions back to then-Teamsters President, Ron Carey, for whom McAuliffe was a rainmaker. While the union officials were sent packing, McAuliffe was never charged with anything, although, again, the cynic may cite that it was Bill Clinton's Justice Department doing the investigating. McAuliffe was then, and remains today, a Clinton confidante (see Forbes).

However, the memories of T-Mac's high-flying days of the good ol' '90s came sweeping back to at least one media member: Rosalind Helderman, of the Post's Virginia Politics Blog, writes that T-Mac rekindled the fire himself with a recent fundraiser with another player from the episode. He brought it up. Will Moran, or Deeds (who today garnered the Post's coveted N.Va./liberal endorsement), follow through?