As lobbyists at the General Assembly, we subscribe to something called Lobbyist In A Box, from the GA's Legislative Information Services division. It's a very handy tool that let's you know, with fair regularity, all the updates to all the bills you track. So, it wasn't a surprise when an update flashed up on HB 10, Delegate Bob Marshall's (R-10, Prince William) Health Care Freedom Act. After all, it passed the House comfortably yesterday and the notice probably was a pro forma notification that it was sent to the Senate. Oh, boy, was it! Just as it did with the coerced abortion bill, the Senate powers have placed HB 10 in the Committee on Education and Health instead of the Commerce and Labor Committee. Could it be that the Democrat leadership doesn't want to get embarrassed with another defeat in that committee, as it did earlier in session with the passage of the senate versions of HB 10? Hmmm.

Here is what the Senate Rules say about the jurisdiction of the two committees:

18 (b). A Committee on Commerce and Labor, 15 Senators, to consider all matters concerning banking; commerce; commercial law; corporations; economic development; industry; insurance; labor; manufacturing; partnerships; public utilities, except matters relating to transportation; tourism; workmen's compensation and unemployment matters.

18 (d). A Committee on Education and Health, 15 Senators, to consider matters concerning education; human reproduction; life support; persons under disability; public buildings; public health; mental health; mental retardation and health professions.

Seems pretty straightforward to me. After all, the House heard four such bills and all were in its Commerce and Labor Committee and the Senate heard three, all in its C&L Committee. How does this not smell? We report. You decide.

In the end, though, Senate Dems are a day late and several bucks short. Today, the Senate bills all passed the House and are on their way to Governor Bob McDonnell. Too, bad, liberals.