Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has given its imprimatur to Obamacare and its coercion of Christian faiths to provide for abortion and contraception against their beliefs (where are all the civil libertarians on this?), the hiring of a 16,000-man IRS army to enforce government dictates, an unquantifiable increase of government intrusion into the most personal areas of life (and death), an infinitesimal amount of new regulations and an immeasurable expansion of government debt, here is but one of the consequences sure to come down in the future if the next Congress and president do not repeal the law: Doctor strikes. How do we know? Because the future isn't the future. It's the present. We can see it in the countries that have socialized their health care industries and accumulated massive debt over time. Not able to maintain pace with mounting costs government-run systems naturally incurs, cutbacks occur — in personnel (layoffs), in compensation to attract the best scientific minds into the field (fewer doctors), in treatment (rationing), and the like.

In Britain, the granddaddy of Western socialized medicine, doctors voted to go on strike against their employer, the government-run National Health Service, over pension payments. From The Guardian (UK):

Delegates agreed that more industrial action was necessary to try to force ministers to backtrack on pension arrangements that have infuriated the profession because they will force doctors to work until they are 68, pay more to pension contributions and forfeit their final salary scheme.

The BMA motion said any future action "should be in conjunction with other public sector unions" and that the ruling council of the medical union "should consider a range of options in defence of our pensions".

The options included a withdrawal from the establishment of clinical commissioning groups, bodies that will become key in the NHS in England under the coalition's controversial health reforms.

In secondary hospital care, the option is for "withdrawal of labour with emergency cover only". Such a move would mean the NHS being able to offer only a minimal service, similar to that given on Christmas Day or bank holidays when staff deal only with emergency cases. (Emphasis added.)

Think we have a mountain of pension debt, now, with our current unfunded liabilities? Just wait until the government begins to run the entire system and has to pay those new IRS agents, the tens of thousands of new HHS bureaucrats and government employed medical personnel. Do you really want your doctor reduced to a public-sector-union bureaucrat — with no incentive to treat you and the possibility that he or she may strike.

This won't happen overnight, and leftist apologists will harangue anyone who posits the theory. But it will happen over time. Just as with any government-run program that gets too big to fail and just as we've seen in Britain over the years, and are seeing now. Already, the system is so melted down that hospital staffs are minimal during holidays. Who knew sickness, injuries, accidents and diseases took off on holidays?

A union consultant said this recently at a doctors' union conference:

We need to send out a very strong message to the government that we are serious about this, and get another day of action (strike) on the books. Let's get more days of action announced and get some momentum around this. ... we are very serious about this and you had better believe it.

Obamacare: The efficiency of the postal system and the compassion and care of Jimmy Hoffa. Just what the doctor didn't order. But it's on its way. Just look at Britain.