As a former “educator,” I find it humorous that so many educrats argue that we should be emphasizing “critical thinking” skills in our schools and fewer “facts,” because, you know, it’s kinda hard to critically think if you, like, don’t know anything. But the more I listen to the “next generation” spout off about issues the more I find myself agreeing that the ability to critically think is, shall we say, lacking.

Today’s example of the need for teaching critical thinking skills comes to us from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court, where this brilliant analysis was articulated:

"I’m really just hoping that the justices see that access to birth control and reproductive health care is a fundamental human right," said Renee Bracey-Sherman, a student and pro-choice activist. "Bosses shouldn’t be able to make a decision based on their personal beliefs to dictate what people have access to."

Now, yes, I recognize that this is someone who is really good at rote memorization.  I mean, she flawlessly nails the abortion industry’s talking point.  No doubt she flies through multiple choice tests.

But ask her for an essay explaining the difference between “access” and “paid for by someone else so you can do what you want without responsibility” and my guess is she’d probably struggle a bit.  Or try to get her to explain how in the world it’s the bosses responsibility to pay for an employee’s birth control or how an employer could possibly deny access to something that one can pick up at the local pharmacy without the boss even knowing (gasp!).  Good luck with that.

Now, redefining terms is nothing new for the left.  It is how they win.  The ability to think notwithstanding, when you can simply change the meaning of words on a whim (or with a really, really awesome PR campaign), you can confuse the heck out of even the most perceptive serf.  And now that they’ve redefined “access” to mean “paid for by someone else so you can do what you want without responsibility,” and gotten a generation of students to memorize it without thinking, they can probably redefine just about anything.

You know, like, marriage.

Or freedom.

Something to think about.